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I am attempting to construct my first linked list, and having read a basic introduction, have done the following. Firstly, declare a linked list node as:

struct errorNode {
    uint8 error;
    struct errorNode* next;
};

Secondly, define the first node globally as:

struct errorNode errorList = {0, NULL};

This has been done to allow each of the libraries that make up my current project to insert errors into a common list. The function to do this is:

void errorListWrite(uint8 error) {
    struct errorNode* newNode = malloc(sizeof(struct errorNode));

    newNode->error = error;

    newNode->next = &errorList;
    errorList = *newNode;
}

Whilst this compiles without error, it does not function as expected. I thnk the problem is with the last two statements of the list write function, but I am unsure. A hint as to what I am doing wrong would be most appreciated.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is that you create a circular list.

newNode->next = &errorList;

So newNode links to the global node.

errorList = *newNode;

This is equivalent to errorList.error = newNode->error; errorList.next = newNode->next;. So now errorList links to the global node. Oops.

What you could do instead, is insert the new node after the global node in the list:

newNode->next = errorList.next;
errorList.next = newNode;

This is assuming that you want a global node at all. If you don't, then you could start with struct errorNode *errorList = 0;, and add a new node like this:

newNode->next = errorList;
errorList = newNode;

When you come to use the list, your list-traversal may look a little different. With a global pointer-to-node you'll start with a pointer to the first node, that you must check for null before using. With a global node you'd start with a node that definitely exists, but whose next pointer might be null.

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... and whose error code is always 0 –  Vlad Oct 12 '12 at 9:42

Well, the problem is with the last line: you are just overwriting the data in in the old error node!

What you probably need is to have the head (pointer to the first node) globally accessible, not the first node itself. This way you don't need a fake entry in your list.

(Be warned that your code is not thread-safe.)

Code:

errorNode* pGlobalErrorList = NULL;

// in errorListWrite
newNode->next = pGlobalErrorList;
pGlobalErrorList = newNode;
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Your head (errorList) should be a pointer and should be initialized to NULL unless you have a need for the initial entry of a node with a value of 0:

struct errorNode* errorList = NULL;

Then your function needs to reassign errorList properly.

void errorListWrite(uint8 error) { 
    struct errorNode* newNode = malloc(sizeof(struct errorNode)); 

    newNode->error = error; 
    newNode->next = errorList;

    errorList = newNode; 
} 

This is all assuming your new node will be the new head of the list, and not the new tail.

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errorList should be a pointer to first node (not the first node)

also you need to know what is the last node this will be modified the head of list will not be modified, it will be used only when you want to travel from the beginning of list.

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