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I have the following class written for PHP 5.4.x. Should this work as I expect?

class SqlBuilder {
    private $dbTable;
    private $action;
    private $data;
    private $clause;

    public function toString() {
        // $sql = generate sql string
        // [...]
        return $sql;
    }

    [...]

    public function setClause($clause) {
        $this->clause = $clause;
    }

    public function setDbTable($dbTable) {
        $this->dbTable = $dbTable;
    }   

    public function setAction($action) {
        $this->action = $action;
    }
}   
$sql = (new \dbal\SqlBuilder())
            ->setAction($this->action)
            ->setClause($this->clause)
            ->setDbTable($this->dbTable)
            ->toString();

I am expecting to be able to access all of my setter methods. Instead I see the following error:

Fatal error: Call to a member function toString() on a non-object )

This seems to work:

$builder= new \dbal\SqlBuilder();
$builder->setAction($this->action)
$builder->setClause($this->clause)
$builder->setDbTable($this->dbTable)
$sql = $builder->toString();

But I know that this works as well:

class Foo
{
    public $a = "I'm a!";
    public $b = "I'm b!";
    public $c;

    public function getB() {
        return $this->b;
    }

    public function setC($c) {
        $this->c = $c;
        return $this;
    }

    public function getC() {
        return $this->c;
    }
}

print (new Foo)
       ->setC($_GET["c"])
       ->getC(); // I'm c!

I've used this style of syntax in Javascript before. Is there a way to make it work in PHP?

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5  
I'm not sure I understand the question. –  deceze Oct 11 '12 at 22:29
    
What is the SqlBuilder class? I don't recognize that. –  Geoff Montee Oct 11 '12 at 22:39
1  
I'm really disappointed that this was closed as not a real question. Yes, the individual asking had a hard time articulating his question, but this IS a real question. If you had taken the time to read it carefully I think you would understand what he was asking for. –  Joshua Kaiser Oct 12 '12 at 19:29
    
I've revised the question to reflect what I believe nakwa was asking. –  Joshua Kaiser Oct 12 '12 at 19:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

What you are asking about is called method chaining. In order for it to work the way you want, each method call needs to return a reference to the object that you are calling. So,

->setAction($this->action)
// needs to return $this; so that
        ->setClause($this->clause)
// knows what to operate upon and in turn needs to return $this; so that
        ->setDbTable($this->dbTable)
// can do the same

Try :

public function setClause($clause) {
    $this->clause = $clause;
    return $this;
}

public function setDbTable($dbTable) {
    $this->dbTable = $dbTable;
    return $this;
}   

public function setAction($action) {
    $this->action = $action;
    return $this;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Just a side-note... When you create an instance of a class, the constructor returns an instance of the class. When you assign this to a variable, you then have the reference to the class stored in the variable, so when you are calling something in the object, you are doing so by it's reference. In a class, the $this variable contains the same reference, so by returning $this, as in the example above, you are returning that same reference, making the chaining possible. –  Shane Oct 23 '12 at 4:37
    
True. This also keeps it efficient. Since you are returning the reference to the instance, you aren't taking up more memory with each call :) –  Joshua Kaiser Oct 23 '12 at 4:42
    
Not sure about that - is that because you are still in the scope of the object, so you do not need to step out then back in to call the member function? –  Shane Oct 23 '12 at 4:45
1  
It's because it's pointing to the instance of the object in the same memory space. That's what the reference is. –  Joshua Kaiser Oct 23 '12 at 4:47

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