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In the viewpoint of running code in the UI thread, is there any difference between:

MainActivity.this.runOnUiThread(new Runnable() {
    public void run() {
        Log.d("UI thread", "I am the UI thread");
    }
});

or

MainActivity.this.myView.post(new Runnable() {
    public void run() {
        Log.d("UI thread", "I am the UI thread");
    }
});

and

private class BackgroundTask extends AsyncTask<String, Void, Bitmap> {
    protected void onPostExecute(Bitmap result) {
        Log.d("UI thread", "I am the UI thread");
    }
}
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6  
+1, good question –  Alex Lockwood Oct 11 '12 at 23:35
    
Thanks for the answer, it clarifies differences in the event queue. –  Luky Oct 11 '12 at 23:55
    
To clarify my question: I supposed those code were called from a service thread, typically a listener. I also supposed there is a heavy work to accomplish either in the doInBackground() function of the AsynkTask or in a new Task(...) called before the first two snippet. Anyway the onPostExecute() of the AsyncTask is being put at the end of the event queue, right? –  Luky Oct 12 '12 at 0:03
    
@Luky You have some pretty good answers. Please be cool and select one as the answer to your question. –  The Thom Sep 9 at 17:53

4 Answers 4

None of those are precisely the same, though they will all have the same net effect.

The difference between the first and the second is that if you happen to be on the main application thread when executing the code, the first one (runOnUiThread()) will execute the Runnable immediately. The second one (post()) always puts the Runnable at the end of the event queue, even if you are already on the main application thread.

The third one, assuming you create and execute an instance of BackgroundTask, will waste a lot of time grabbing a thread out of the thread pool, to execute a default no-op doInBackground(), before eventually doing what amounts to a post(). This is by far the least efficient of the three. Use AsyncTask if you actually have work to do in a background thread, not just for the use of onPostExecute().

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8  
Also note that AsyncTask.execute() requires you to call from the UI thread anyway, which renders this option useless for the use case of simply running code on the UI thread from a background thread unless you move all of your background work into doInBackground() and use AsyncTask properly. –  kabuko Oct 11 '12 at 23:56

And there is forth way using Handler

new Handler().post(new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        // Code here will run in UI thread
    }
});
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postOnUiThread() uses a Handler to do this though :) –  Alex Lockwood Oct 11 '12 at 23:40
24  
You should be careful with this. Because if you create a handler in a non UI thread you will post messages to the non UI Thread. A handler by default post message to the thread where it is created. –  lujop Mar 17 '13 at 18:10
28  
to execute on the main UI thread do new Handler(Looper.getMainLooper()).post(r), which is the preferred manner as Looper.getMainLooper() makes a static call to main, whereas postOnUiThread() must have an instance of MainActivity in scope. –  HPP Oct 2 '13 at 6:55
1  
@HPP I didn't know this method, will be a great way when you don't have nor Activity neither a View. Works great! thanks you veryy veryy much! –  Sulfkain Apr 9 at 12:58

I like the one from HPP comment, it can be used anywhere without any parameter:

new Handler(Looper.getMainLooper()).post(new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        Log.d("UI thread", "I am the UI thread");
    }
});
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Essentially, no, there isn't any difference -- though your AsyncTask option would be quite a strange way to accomplish this.

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