Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

First of all: sorry for using c shell, blame my company not me. I hate the damn thing as much as most of you do now (at first I was like, hey this ain't so bad).

I am trying to subtract large numbers obtained from time stamps. Here is what I am trying:

set curTime = `date +%s%N`
#... some stuff
@curTime = `date +%s%N` - $curTime #get the diff
echo "time taken: $curTime"

However I guess the numbers are too big - before I tried with just seconds and it worked fine. Here's what I see in the log:

@curMilli = 1349996279792995000 - 1349996279170458000
@curMilli: Command not found.

As I said I do the exact same thing with date +%s and it's fine, so I'm assuming it's something about the largeness of the numbers.

How can I do this? Thanks a lot.

share|improve this question
3  
The article en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bc_programming_language has a short section "Using bc in shell scripts". –  Joseph Quinsey Oct 11 '12 at 23:36
    
Thanks for that. Could I get some help on modifying my command? I've tried @curMilli = 1349996279792995000 - 1349996279170458000 | bc without success; I've also tried variations with parenthesis () surrounding parts of the expression, to no avail. –  JDS Oct 11 '12 at 23:51
1  
I think you need a semi-colon. echo "1349996279792995000 - 1349996279170458000;" | bc gives 622537000. –  Joseph Quinsey Oct 11 '12 at 23:59
    
That's great! And if I wrap in those sideways ticks `` it seems to work in variable assignment. Go ahead and post and answer to get accepted bro –  JDS Oct 12 '12 at 0:06
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The article http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bc_programming_language has a short section "Using bc in shell scripts". A test:

set curTime = `/bin/date +%s%N`
/bin/sleep 2
set prevTime = $curTime
set curTime = `/bin/date +%s%N`
set diff = `echo "$curTime - $prevTime;" | /usr/bin/bc`
echo $diff

will give (with the digits after the initial 20 variable):

2016204108

P.s: I wish I could vote you up twice for "I hate the damn thing as much as most of you do now (at first I was like, hey this ain't so bad)."

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.