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<choices>
   <sic  />
   <corr />
   <reg  />
   <orig />
</choices>

<choice>
   <corr>Red</corr>
   <sic>Blue</sic>
<choice>

I want to select the first element in <choice> whose name matches the name of any element in <choices>.

If name(node-set) returned a list of names instead of only the name of the first node, I could use

select="choice/*[name() = name(choices/*)][1]"

But it doesn't (at least not in 1.0), so instead I join the names together in a string and use contains():

<xsl:variable name="choices.str">
    <xsl:for-each select="choices/*">
        <xsl:text> </xsl:text><xsl:value-of select="concat(name(),' ')"/>
    </xsl:for-each>
</xsl:variable>
<xsl:apply-templates select="choice/*[contains($choices.str,name())][1]"/>

and get what I want:

Red, the value of <corr>

Is there a more straightforward way?

share|improve this question
    
Can it be assumed that there is exaclty one choice element? Or might there be multiple of them? Might there be none of them? –  Sean B. Durkin Oct 12 '12 at 2:27
    
Neither choices nor choice will have multiple elements with the same name. Right now, either or both could be empty, but I could disallow that if doing so gave me a cleaner solution. –  JPM Oct 12 '12 at 14:23
    
You misunderstood my question. It was not about the cardinality of the children of choice, but about the cardinality of choice. For example, is it possible that count(/t/choice)=2 ? –  Sean B. Durkin Oct 13 '12 at 5:30
    
Oh, sorry. Yes, choice will appear many times, scattered throughout the hierarchy. <choices> appears once, as a configuration parameter indicating how all the instances of <choice> should be treated. –  JPM Oct 13 '12 at 11:42
    
That's good. My solution remains correct, even when there are multiple choice elements. –  Sean B. Durkin Oct 14 '12 at 11:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use the key() function like this...

When this input document...

<t>
<choices>
   <sic  />
   <corr />
   <reg  />
   <orig />
</choices>
<choice>
   <corr>Red</corr>
   <sic>Blue</sic>
  </choice>
</t>

...is supplied as input to this XSLT 1.0 style-sheet...

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
<xsl:output method="text"/>
<xsl:key name="kChoices" match="choices/*" use="name()" />  

<xsl:template match="/">
  <xsl:variable name="first-choice" select="(*/choice/*[key('kChoices',name())])[1]" />
  <xsl:value-of select="$first-choice" />
  <xsl:text>, the value of &lt;</xsl:text>
  <xsl:value-of select="name( $first-choice)" />
  <xsl:text>&gt;</xsl:text>
</xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

...this output text is produced...

Red, the value of <corr>

XSLT 2.0 Aside

In XSLT 2.0, you would be able to use the following alternatives for the computation of the $first-choice variable...

Option 1:

(*/choice/*[for $c in . return ../../choices/*[name()=name($c)]])[1]

Option 2:

(*/choice/*[some $c in ../../choices/* satisfies name($c)=name()])[1]
share|improve this answer
    
A document is not "applied" to a styleshhet -- it is just the opposite. –  Dimitre Novatchev Oct 12 '12 at 0:13
    
Yes. I often get that mixed up. Correcting.. –  Sean B. Durkin Oct 12 '12 at 2:19

I. Use this XPath 2.0 one-liner:

/*/choice/*[name() = /*/choices/*/name()][1]

When this XPath expression is evaluated against the following XML document (the provided one, but corrected to become a well-formed XML document):

<t>
    <choices>
        <sic  />
        <corr />
        <reg  />
        <orig />
    </choices>
    <choice>
        <corr>Red</corr>
        <sic>Blue</sic>
    </choice>
</t>

the correct element is selected:

<corr>Red</corr>

II. XSLT 1.0 (no keys!):

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:variable name="vNames">
  <xsl:for-each select="/*/choices/*">
   <xsl:value-of select="concat(' ', name(), ' ')"/>
  </xsl:for-each>
 </xsl:variable>

 <xsl:template match="/">
  <xsl:copy-of select=
  "/*/choice/*
         [contains($vNames, concat(' ', name(), ' '))]
           [1]"/>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When this transformation is applied on the same XML document (above), again the correct element is selected (and copied to the output):

<corr>Red</corr>

III. Using keys:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

  <xsl:key name="kChoiceByName" match="choice/*"
   use="boolean(/*/choices/*[name()=name(current())])"/>

 <xsl:template match="/">
  <xsl:copy-of select="/*/choice/*[key('kChoiceByName', true())][1]"/>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When this transformation is applied against the same XML document (above), the same correct result is produced:

<corr>Red</corr>

It is recommended to the reader to try to understand how this all "works" :)

share|improve this answer
    
III really works? The value of a key can be an expression that isn't evaluated until key() is called? And current() is then the context when key() is called? If the select will be run against many instances of <choice> it seems Sean's creation of a static key value would be much faster. -- Or has this reader failed to see "how this all works"? –  JPM Oct 12 '12 at 1:18
    
@JPM, Yes, it works! And yes, there is no reason to construct an index before a key() function has been called. This is a good test of understanding how xsl:key and the key() function work. Efficiency: Indexing should take the same time. Getting just the first item of the value of a key should also be O(1). If the optimizer is good, it wouldn't even construct the whole index -- but just the first value for true(). To verify that this "really works", try putting different choice/* elements as the first child of their parent -- you'll see that the solution works in all cases. –  Dimitre Novatchev Oct 12 '12 at 2:58
    
Well that's a mind-stretcher. Thanks! Unless this is clearly faster than Sean's, however, I think I'd usually take his approach, just because it relies only on the conventionally documented uses of keys and so will be easier for someone later to maintain. But very interesting! Thanks. –  JPM Oct 12 '12 at 3:23
    
@JPM, Whether it is faster or not depends on which XSLT processor is used (the Optimizer part) and being faster only matters if the indexes are significantly long. So, to compare the performance, one would need to vary two things -- the XSLT processor and the number of choices/* and choice/*. I expect that given a sufficiently big number of choices/* and choice/* and a good optimizer, my solution could be significantly faster -- as only the first item of the index would need to be built. –  Dimitre Novatchev Oct 12 '12 at 3:50
    
@JPM, Regardless of efficiency (my first test shows both solutions to have roughly the same efficiency), I would prefer the shorter solution. Also, if the search is performed only once per execution, it wouldn't be surprizing if the no-key solutions turns out to be faster. –  Dimitre Novatchev Oct 12 '12 at 4:18

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