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In a nut shell i have to create a calculate that input 4 numerical values which is then multiplied by the price per unit added up and the tax calculated into the total. I have been surfing for scripts but fail.

EDIT***: I have edited parts of the code from what I have read and understood but still can not get my function to execute the commands and execute a value with the tax.

 <html>
<head>
<title>Purchase&Tip Calculator</title>
function calculate() {
    var total = cost*total;
    var cost = document.getElementById("cost").value;
    var tax = document.getElementById("tax").value;

    total = cost*tax;
    document.getElementById("total").value = total;
}
</script>

</head>

<body>

<h1 align="left">Purchase&Tip Calculator</h1>

<input type="text" id="cost" />

<input type="text" id="cost" />

<input type="text" id="cost" />

<input type="text" id="tax" />

<input type="text" id="total" />

<button id="cost" onclick="calculate()" value="Calculate!" />Calculate!</button>
    </form>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this question
    
There's nothing in what you've got here that will invoke fixOrder. –  ultranaut Oct 12 '12 at 0:16
    
other than that you should remove total = from total = document.getElementById("total").value = "$" + total.toFixed(2); I can't see the problem. –  Asad Oct 12 '12 at 0:16
    
what would be the best code for inputting 4 Price tabs? Just copy paste the same command 3 more times? –  user1739624 Oct 12 '12 at 0:26
    
Also, it wont execute the total automatically, on " total = getTax($('#tax').val()) * sum;" it just shows up is something incorrect? –  user1739624 Oct 12 '12 at 0:27
    
god, so complicated. So, the parsefloat commands are useless for this type of code? @robG –  user1739624 Oct 12 '12 at 0:49

2 Answers 2

In your code:

> function fixOrder() {
>     const TAX = 0.975;

const is a future reserved word and not part of ECMAScript. It has been added to JavaScript, and may be in a future version of ECMAScript, but should not be used on the general web as it will throw an error in browsers that don't support it.

>    var numPrice;
>    var total;
>    var tax;
> 
>    numPrice = parseFloat(document.getElementById("cost").value, 10);

parseFloat accepts a single string argument. There is no radix as for parseInt. There are many ways of converting a string to a number, one is the unary + operator, another is Number called as a function. parseFloat is probably fine, just more to type.

Since your controls are in a form, you can access them more easily as named properties of the form:

  var form = document.getElementById('form');
  numPrice = +form.cost.value;

>    tax      = parseFloat(document.getElementById("tax").value, 10);

There is already a variable named TAX, this value isn't used anywhere.

>    total    = parseFloat(document.getElementById("total").value, 10);
>    numPrice = numPrice * TAX;
>    total    = numPrice;

Here the value of total is assigned twice, the second replaces the first.

>    total    = document.getElementById("total").value = "$" + total.toFixed(2);

This type of assignment is not good for maintenance, much better to keep it simple. Also it appears that total will have a leading "$", which will cause parseFloat to return NaN. Better to put the "$" in the text of the form and just put the value in the field.

You can use compound operators for arithmetic, they can confuse but if used a number of times become easier to spot. Perhaps you meant:

  total = parseFloat(form.total.value);
  numPrice *= TAX;
  total += numPrice;
  form.total.value = total.toFixed(2);

In the HTML part:

>  <p>Total: <input type="text" id="total" name="total" value="" disabled=
   "disabled" /></p>

You don't want the total field to be disabled as that gives it a disabled appearance. Also, the disabled attribute does not require a value (unless you are using XHTML, and no one actually uses it on the web).

You can make the field readonly:

 <p>Total: $<input type="text" name="total" readonly></p>

but users will wonder why there is a field they can't modify. Consider instead making it a span and update its text or innerHTML:

 <p>Total: $<span id="total">0.00</span></p>

and

  document.getElementById('total').innerHTML = total.toFixed(2);

Then you can also style the content as bold or simlar.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Robg! Big help! –  user1739624 Oct 12 '12 at 1:07
    
don't you think your answer is exceedingly verbose for this question? It's thorough, which is fine, but there is a thing as too much information. Our question poster is clearly a novice, and explanation of the debatable inclusion of constants as a part of ECMAscript is just ridiculous in my mind... –  Mike Hometchko Oct 12 '12 at 2:44
    
The OP used const incorrectly, explaining it seems reasonable. Answers aren't just for the poster, but anyone who has a similar question. When there are lots of things to cover, sometimes it's easier to just say "hey, do it this way". I chose not to do that (this time). :-) –  RobG Oct 12 '12 at 6:24

If I understand you correctly, you are attempting to gather a few numbers from input fields, do some calculations, and print the result? If that's the case I'll give you a base example:

var total = 0;
var cost = document.getElementById("cost").value;
var tax = document.getElementById("tax").value;

total = cost*tax;

Your total value shouldn't be coming from an input element (at least that doesn't make sense to me). You instead want to define it within your code, zero is standard practice. Then you simply initialize cost and tax with the appropriate variables and multiply them together, setting that result as the value of your "total" variable.

This should be bound to an event (such as a button click or a keydown/up) to be fired after the input fields have been appropriated. Hope this helps!

Part II

This is in response to the received comment below. First you want to create a function to encapsulate this code:

function calculate() {
    var total = 0;
    var cost = document.getElementById("cost").value;
    var tax = document.getElementById("tax").value;

    total = cost*tax;
    document.getElementById("total").value = total;
}

Here is the corresponding HTML:

<input type="text" id="cost" />
<input type="text" id="tax" />
<input type="text" id="total" />
<button id="cost" onclick="calculate()" value="Calculate!" />Calculate!</button>

Here is a working example: http://fluidev.com/stack/calculate/index.html

share|improve this answer
    
I have one simple question left, as i put the onmouseclick do i need a src code for it? no correct because it doesnt need to show an image but a total –  user1739624 Oct 12 '12 at 0:40
    
well theres still quite a bit to do from the example I showed you, it was just a logical explanation...I'll offer you a complete working example now to help out a bit more –  Mike Hometchko Oct 12 '12 at 0:41
    
Your code base is toward the input codes for the tax total and price right at the end of my coding @MikeHometchko –  user1739624 Oct 12 '12 at 0:45
    
this should do it for you –  Mike Hometchko Oct 12 '12 at 0:57
    
Thanks @MikeHometchko!!!! great help!! –  user1739624 Oct 12 '12 at 1:08

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