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I saw a Windows batch file as follows:

..
::Handle the case where the install dir is specified as a drive
if not "%1" == "" if /I "%1" == "%~d1" set INSTALL_DIR=%~d1
..

Question 1: I never see two IF statements are used together like this. Does it act like AND, i.e., (persudo code: (("%1" != "") and (%1 == "%~d1")) ?

Question 2: It seems that it will set INSTALL_DIR only if %1 is a drive. But isn't the following single check already enough?

if /I "%1" == "%~d1" set INSTALL_DIR=%~d1
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The fact that 2 if's are used together doesn't really make a lot of difference, it just so happens that the command to run if the first is successful is another if statement.

Yes, the 2 if's have the equivalent functionality as an AND logic.

The single check does seem to be enough, but only if they aren't doing specific error messages with the batch.

For example, if there is no parameter given they may want to check this explicitly, and give an error message stating there is no parameter. Then if there is one, and it isn't a drive, give another error message for that.

Hope this helps.

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Question 1: You may find that it is easier to do your IF nesting like this (for readability).

..
::Handle the case where the install dir is specified as a drive
if not "%1" == "" ( 
if /I "%1" == "%~d1" ( 
set INSTALL_DIR=%~d1
)
)
..

This also lets you nest more than one command in the "if" instance. For example:

..
::Handle the case where the install dir is specified as a drive
if not "%1" == "" ( 
echo Parameter 1 is not empty
if /I "%1" == "%~d1" ( 
echo Parameter 1 is a drive so setting the variable
set INSTALL_DIR=%~d1
)
)
..

Question 2: In your example the test does effectively require the parameter to be either a drive or path (with drive) and filters the parameter down to the drive alone.

Is it enough? That depends on if you need to do additional checking like:

  • if the drive exists
  • if the drive is a local hard disk

If the checks you have are enough is really up to you and how robust you need your code to be and how much control you have over what is used in %1.

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