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I have something like this:

plym    fury    77      73      2500
chevy   nova    79      60      3000
ford    mustang 65      45      10000
volvo   gl      78      102     9850
ford    ltd     83      15      10500
chevy   nova    80      50      3500
fiat    600     65      115     450
honda   accord  81      30      6000
ford    thundbd 84      10      17000
toyota  tercel  82      180     750
chevy   impala  65      85      1550
ford    bronco  83      25      9500

and I need to create a list that show all the cars that cost less than $10,000, except Chevys. The list should be sorted from lowest cost to highest .

I must use sed with quit option and regular expression (DO NOT use repetition)

so far I have this

grep -iv "chevy" cars | sort -nk 5 | sed '/regex$/ q'

I'm having a problem with the regex WITHOUT repetition.

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can you edit your question to include an example of what you mean by repetition. Good luck. –  shellter Oct 12 '12 at 2:07
    
Hi shelter, I'm not sure what meas without repetition either :-( –  juanp_1982 Oct 12 '12 at 21:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Is this homework?

  • Since you're already sorting in ascending order of cost, you just need to stop grabbing lines when the cost becomes five digits.
  • sed '/regex$/q' will stop (because of the q (quit) command) when whatever regex$ is matches.
  • You've already got a $ there to match the end of line, so you just need something in regex that represents five arbitrary characters (or digits if you think that's better).
  • Afterwards, you'll need a few more piped commands to get just the car names (see cut) and remove duplicates (see sort -u and/or uniq)

Follow up to comment:

I'm now assuming that by repetition you mean that don't want your regex pattern to comprise of repeats (i.e. [a-z][a-z][a-z]). (I'd initially thought that you meant you didn't want duplicate car names so I've now striked that part out.)

You'll probably be interested in these syntax:

Along with:

  • ? - zero or one
  • * - zero or many
  • + - one or many

There's also:

  • {n} - exactly n times
  • {n,} - n or more times.
  • {n,m} - n to m times.

You'll also probably want to specify -r when using these so that you don't have to escape everything. (e.g. sed -r '[a-z]{3}' as opposed to sed '[a-z]\{3\}'.

See REGULAR EXPRESSIONS under man egrep for more information about the egrep syntax (which sed uses).

share|improve this answer
    
thanks antak, the problem that I'm having it's precisely with regex, I don't know what to put there without using repetitions :-( –  juanp_1982 Oct 12 '12 at 6:46
    
I've updated the answer to follow up on your comment. –  antak Oct 12 '12 at 7:53
    
Thanks antak I forgot to answer your very first question, yes this is homework I tried: > grep -iv "chevy" cars.txt | sort -nk 5 | sed -r '/[0-9]{5,}$/ q' and it works when I running myself however since I'm also running this command through my professor script and it doesn't I think the script only accept one correct answer. I'm not sure what means "without repetition neither" –  juanp_1982 Oct 12 '12 at 19:10
    
I dunno, you'll have to ask your professor. But here're some points to note: You don't need the space between / q, and the comma in {5,} isn't technically needed (because it's sorted). –  antak Oct 13 '12 at 2:33
    
Hi antak thanks a lot for your help! I found the answer (the one that the script accepted) and I must said it's kind of disappointed > grep -iv "chevy" cars | sort -nk 5 | sed '/[0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9]$/q' –  juanp_1982 Oct 13 '12 at 6:45

You could do this much more simply using GNU awk:

awk '!/chevy/ && $NF < 10000 { print | "sort -nk 5" }' file.txt

Results:

fiat    600     65      115     450
toyota  tercel  82      180     750
plym    fury    77      73      2500
honda   accord  81      30      6000
ford    bronco  83      25      9500
volvo   gl      78      102     9850

Update:

Here's one way using GNU sed:

< file.txt sort -nk 5 | sed -nre '/chevy/d' -e '/.* [0-9]{,4}$/p'

Results:

fiat    600     65      115     450
toyota  tercel  82      180     750
plym    fury    77      73      2500
honda   accord  81      30      6000
ford    bronco  83      25      9500
volvo   gl      78      102     9850
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks steve, I appreciate you answer, but I would like to use sed since I'm learning it –  juanp_1982 Oct 12 '12 at 6:44
    
@juanp_1982: Please see the update. I don't think you can, could or should use sed's quit option. HTH. –  Steve Oct 12 '12 at 6:54
    
thanks! that works! but I'm running my professor script to validate my command and doesn't like it, I must use sed with quit. the idea is that when find the regex quit showing the output. it also complain about no using repetition (I'm not sure what it means) –  juanp_1982 Oct 13 '12 at 0:30

With awk and GNU sort :

awk '!/chevy/{if($5 < 10000){print}}' file.txt | sort -n -k 5

output

fiat    600     65      115     450
toyota  tercel  82      180     750
plym    fury    77      73      2500
honda   accord  81      30      6000
ford    bronco  83      25      9500
volvo   gl      78      102     9850

sed is not designed to make arithmetic expressions. Some guys have had try there Sed substitution possible with arithmetic involved?


ANOTHER SOLUTION using Perl, tested on Minix & Archlinux (very portable)

perl -lane '
    END{for (sort {$a<=>$b} keys %h) {print $h{$_}}}
    $h{$F[-1] . " " . $F[1]} = join "\t", @F
        if $F[-1] < 10000 && $F[1] ne "chevy"
' file.txt
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks sputnick, I appreciate you answer, but I would like to use sed since I'm learning it –  juanp_1982 Oct 12 '12 at 6:44

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