Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a 1,660 row array like this:

...
H00504
H00085
H00181
H00500
H00103
H00007
H00890
H08793
H94316
H00217
...

And the leading character never changes. It is always "H" then five digits. But when I do what I believe is a numerical sort in Perl, I'm getting strange results. Some segments are sorted in order, but then a different segment starts up. Here is a segment after sorting:

...
H01578
H01579
H01580
H01581
H01582
H01583
H01584
H00536
H00537
H00538
H01585
H01586
H01587
H01588
H01589
H01590
...

What I'm trying is this:

my @sorted_array = sort {$a <=> $b} @raw_array;

But obviously it is not working. Anyone know why?

I should add that, although these values all have "H" prepended, there remains the possibility that in the future we might end up with additional data prepended with some other letter. This means that removing the H, sorting, then replacing the H, is not a solution

share|improve this question

migrated from programmers.stackexchange.com Oct 12 '12 at 2:05

This question came from our site for professional programmers interested in conceptual questions about software development.

    
I should add that, although these values all have "H" prepended, there remains the possibility that in the future we might end up with additional data prepended with some other letter. This means that removing the H, sorting, then replacing the H, is not a solution. –  Luke Sheppard Oct 11 '12 at 23:27
    
...because it is impossible to replace the letter H? –  TLP Oct 12 '12 at 12:25

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

If you were using use strict; use warnings; as you should, you would have gotten numerous errors of the form

Argument "H01578" isn't numeric in numeric comparison (<=>)

None of your elements are numbers, so they're all considered zero. That's why Perl considers the result of your current code sorted.


If you want to sort by letter then by number (which is the same as sorting just by number since all the letters are the same):

my @sorted_array = sort @raw_array;

which is short for

my @sorted_array = sort { $a cmp $b } @raw_array;

If you wanted to sort by number regardless of the leading letter, you'd use the following instead:

my @sorted_array =
   sort { substr($a, 1) <=> substr($b, 1) }
    @raw_array;
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Recommend sticking with the sort @ary, however, since the OP clarified (in a comment to self) that the 'H' prefix may someday be other letters. –  pilcrow Oct 12 '12 at 2:29
1  
+1 for being the only one to realize that this is best handled by the default sort. –  TLP Oct 12 '12 at 19:09

If you want to sort by your initial character as primary key followed by the digits as secondary key then you can use a variation of the Schwartzian Transform which extracts the two fields for comparison from all the data before sorting.

This program demonstrates

use strict;
use warnings;

my @data = <DATA>;
chomp @data;

my @sorted = sort map $_->[0],
sort { $a->[1] cmp $b->[1] or $a->[2] <=> $b->[2] }
map [$_, /(.)(.+)/], @data;

print "$_\n" for @sorted;

__DATA__
A1180
B0802
B1284
C0899
C1455
C0765
A1207
A0909
C0921
C1060
A1067
B1486
A1268
B0772
C0595
B0734
A1004
A0607
A1323
B1181

output

A0607
A0909
A1004
A1067
A1180
A1207
A1268
A1323
B0734
B0772
B0802
B1181
B1284
B1486
C0595
C0765
C0899
C0921
C1060
C1455

Tool completed successfully

You may prefer an alternative, which doesn't use the Transform. This program has identical output but will run significantly more slowly for large datasets

my @sorted = sort {
  my @a = $a =~ /(.)(.+)/;
  my @b = $b =~ /(.)(.+)/;
  $a[0] cmp $b[0] or $a[1] <=> $b[1];
} @data;
share|improve this answer
1  
How is that different than my @sorted = sort @data; for fixed width numbers? –  ikegami Oct 12 '12 at 17:53

To ignore to anything what is not a number, you can also:

use strict;
use warnings;

my @sorted =    sort {
                        (my $x = $a) =~ s/\D//g;
                        (my $y = $b) =~ s/\D//g;
                        ($x?$x:0) <=> ($y?$y:0)
                } <DATA>;
print "$_" for @sorted;

__DATA__
a123
a/9999/gyu
b2
333
bbb
c888hh
0

result:

bbb
0
b2
a123
333
c888hh
a/9999/gyu
share|improve this answer

You want something like:

my @sorted_array = sort {substr($a, 1) <=> substr($b,1)} @raw_array;

See: http://ideone.com/trnfy for an example.

If you used the standard sort, without the {...}, that should work as well. Your current code is probably failing because all of the comparisons return 0, because you are doing a numeric comparison on alphanumeric data.

share|improve this answer
    
see also List::UtilsBy::sort_by –  LeoNerd Oct 12 '12 at 13:43

You can avoid the Schwartzian transforms and other related noise by using List::UtilsBy::sort_by:

use List::UtilsBy qw( sort_by );

my @sorted_array = sort_by { substr($_, 1) } @raw_array;
share|improve this answer
    
Rather than only post a block of code, please explain why this code solves the problem posed. Without an explanation, this is not an answer. –  Martijn Pieters Oct 12 '12 at 13:49
    
Now edited, is that better? –  LeoNerd Oct 12 '12 at 13:52
    
Yup, much. Thanks! Your post was listed in the low quality queue before. –  Martijn Pieters Oct 12 '12 at 13:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.