Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

How to obtain the transaction begin time in Oracle? Is there such a built-in function to be used in queries?

More specifically, I need a function, let's call it trans_begin_time(), to be used in this way:

UPDATE MYTABLE
SET batch_update_time = trans_begin_time()
WHERE some_criteria 

Such a function, if exists, would help me in two ways:

first, I can update all the records with the same date value - please note sysdate won't work as this is very a large table and sysdate would give varying values.

Second, I would be able to use it anywhere without the need to store sysdate value beforehand and then use it in the query.

Thanks.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

11:43:20 SYSTEM@sandbox> create table test as select * from dual;         

Table created.                                                                 

Elapsed: 00:00:00.04                                                           
11:43:26 SYSTEM@sandbox> set transaction read write name 'test';          

Transaction set.                                                               

Elapsed: 00:00:00.00                                                           
11:43:35 SYSTEM@sandbox> insert into test values (1);                     

1 row created.                                                                 

Elapsed: 00:00:00.00                                                           
11:43:42 SYSTEM@sandbox> select name, start_time from v$transaction;      

NAME       START_TIME                                                          
---------- --------------------                                                
test       10/12/12 11:43:34                                                   

Elapsed: 00:00:00.01                                                           
11:43:47 SYSTEM@sandbox> commit;                                          

Commit complete.                                                               

Elapsed: 00:00:00.01                                                           
11:44:00 SYSTEM@sandbox> select name, start_time from v$transaction;      

no rows selected                                                               

Elapsed: 00:00:00.00                                                           
11:44:02 SYSTEM@sandbox>                     

Or, for each session:

11:59:15 SYSTEM@Sandbox> set transaction name 'test_by_addr';                           

Transaction set.                                                                             

Elapsed: 00:00:00.00                                                                         
11:59:18 SYSTEM@Sandbox> insert into test values(1);                                    

1 row created.                                                                               

Elapsed: 00:00:00.00                                                                         
11:59:21 SYSTEM@Sandbox> get xact                                                       
  1  select s.sid                                                                            
  2        ,s.serial#                                                                        
  3        ,s.username                                                                       
  4        ,s.status                                                                         
  5        ,t.name                                                                           
  6        ,t.start_time                                                                     
  7* from v$transaction t join v$session s on t.addr = s.taddr                               
11:59:27 SYSTEM@Sandbox> /                                                              

       SID    SERIAL# USERNAME                       STATUS   NAME       START_TIME          
---------- ---------- ------------------------------ -------- ---------- --------------------
        39       1015 SYSTEM                         ACTIVE   test_by_ad 10/12/12 11:59:17   
                                                              dr                             


Elapsed: 00:00:00.01                                                                         
11:59:30 SYSTEM@Sandbox> select SYS_CONTEXT('USERENV','SID') from dual;                 

SYS_CONTEXT('USERENV','SID')                                                                 
----------------------------
39                                                                                           

Elapsed: 00:00:00.01                                                                         
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. What I need is a function to call in my query. I have edited my post for more clarification. –  Reza Goodarzi Oct 12 '12 at 4:12
    
@RezaGoodarzi why don't you just manually set a variable to sysdate somewhere in your code, where the transaction actually begins, and then use it wherever you need? –  be here now Oct 12 '12 at 4:32
    
@RezaGoodarzi and, in fact, what high-level task are you solving by this? logging some "last updated" time? –  be here now Oct 12 '12 at 4:35
    
My table is large, and I want all those records that are updated in one batch, get the same value. sysdate wouldn't work in this case. –  Reza Goodarzi Oct 12 '12 at 4:40
    
@RezaGoodarzi declare myTime date := sysdate; begin update MYTABLE set batch_update_time = myTime where blah-blah; commit; end; why doesn't it? just fix your value, don't put sysdate in queries explicitly. –  be here now Oct 12 '12 at 4:42

You can use a function that will return the same date for a single session.

SQL> CREATE OR REPLACE PACKAGE pkg AS
  2     FUNCTION get_session_date RETURN DATE;
  3  END;
  4  /

Package created.

SQL> CREATE OR REPLACE PACKAGE BODY pkg AS
  2     g_date DATE;
  3     FUNCTION get_session_date RETURN DATE IS BEGIN RETURN g_date; END;
  4  BEGIN
  5     g_date := SYSDATE;
  6  END;
  7  /

Package body created.

SQL> SELECT to_char(pkg.get_session_date, 'dd/mm/yyyy hh24:mi:ss') FROM dual;

TO_CHAR(PKG.GET_SES
-------------------
12/10/2012 10:07:32

SQL> EXEC dbms_lock.sleep(10);

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

SQL> SELECT to_char(pkg.get_session_date, 'dd/mm/yyyy hh24:mi:ss') FROM dual;

TO_CHAR(PKG.GET_SES
-------------------
12/10/2012 10:07:32
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I guess this is what I wanted. A question, though. Does this work if I change to auto-commit? –  Reza Goodarzi Oct 12 '12 at 8:18
    
The date will only reset on new session: disconnect and reconnect. It will not reset on commit (so it is functionally different from @beherenow 's solution). –  Vincent Malgrat Oct 12 '12 at 8:30
    
you can wrap g_date := SYSDATE; into a procedure and make it public, thus becoming able to reset g_date at an arbitrary moment of time –  be here now Oct 12 '12 at 9:30
    
@Vincent So, during a session which may span multiple transactions, it won't work? –  Reza Goodarzi Oct 13 '12 at 4:28
    
@be Wrapping the sysdate in a function won't help because the values would be re-calculated with each function call. –  Reza Goodarzi Oct 13 '12 at 4:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.