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It has to be with just functions, variables, loops, etc (Basic stuff). I'm having trouble coming up with the code from scratch from what I've I learned so far(Should be able to do it). Makes me really mad :/. If you could give me step by step to make sure I understand I'd really really appreciated. Thanks a bunch in advanced.

How could I get the same result with a simpler code than this one:

var primes=4; 
for (var counter = 2; counter <= 100; counter = counter + 1)
{
    var isPrime = 0;
    if(isPrime === 0){ 
        if(counter === 2){console.log(counter);} 
        else if(counter === 3){console.log(counter);} 
        else if(counter === 5){console.log(counter);} 
        else if(counter === 7){console.log(counter);} 
        else if(counter % 2 === 0){isPrime=0;} 
        else if(counter % 3 === 0){isPrime=0;} 
        else if(counter % 5 === 0){isPrime=0;} 
        else if(counter % 7 === 0){isPrime=0;}
        else {
            console.log(counter);
            primes = primes + 1;
        }
    }
}
console.log("Counted: "+primes+" primes");
share|improve this question
1  
Related: the Sieve of Eratosthenes –  icktoofay Oct 12 '12 at 4:44
    
I'd first start with trying to understand that code. It's pretty simple. You might be confusing simple for shorter. –  sachleen Oct 12 '12 at 4:44
4  
i dont know why "if (isPrime==0)" is right after assigning "isPrime=0". that 'if' is useless –  Jon Dinham Oct 12 '12 at 4:46
    
@sachleen yes really sorry I was trying to say shorter.. –  RufioLJ Oct 12 '12 at 4:48
1  
@RufioLJ, the code you posted unrolls an inner loop to increase speed. It is a common tactic to make code perform better. Prime calculators are known to be extremely CPU intensive. The answer you accepted is poorly written and would take an extremely long time to find primes if you fed it a high bound of primes to find such as 1,000,000 (hint: the inner loop would execute 1 trillion times as currently written). I added a comment how he could improve so 1,000,000 primes would take only 1 billion iterations, but that's still a lot. –  Ed Bayiates Oct 12 '12 at 5:16
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6 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This finds all prime numbers between 2 and 100:

var primes=0; 
var isprime = true;
for (var counter = 2; counter <= 100; counter = counter + 1)
{
    // For now, we believe that it is a prime
    isprime = true;
    var limit = Math.round(Math.sqrt(counter)); // See comment from @AresAvatar, below
    // We try to find a number between 2 and limit that gives us a reminder of 0
    for (var mod = 2; mod <= limit; mod++) {
        // If we find one, we know it's not a prime
        if (counter%mod == 0) {
            isprime = false;
            break; // Break out of the inner for loop
        }
    }

    if (isprime) {
        console.log(counter, limit);
        primes = primes + 1;
    }
}
console.log("Counted: "+primes+" primes");
share|improve this answer
    
I was looking for this.. Thanks a bunch I'm going to try to understand it now.. why do you need to set isprime to true? (I know is in the code I posted I didn't get it either) –  RufioLJ Oct 12 '12 at 4:53
    
Assume it's prime, then do tests to see if it is not. –  sachleen Oct 12 '12 at 4:54
1  
I'd say this code would be a whole lot more inefficient than the original –  Aran Mulholland Oct 12 '12 at 4:54
    
Yeah this user understood exactly what I wanted! This is all I've learned so far. What is the break; for? Also why is he comparing the "mod" with the "counter"? –  RufioLJ Oct 12 '12 at 4:56
    
to make sure it is not divisible by any number less than it –  Aran Mulholland Oct 12 '12 at 4:58
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I'm feeling naughty today so:

function printPrimesBetweenTwoAndOneHundredSimply(){

   var primes = [2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41, 43, 47, 53, 59, 61, 67, 71, 73, 79, 83, 89, 97],
   i,
   arrayLength = primes.length;

   for(i = 0; i < arrayLength; i++){
     console.log(primes[i]);
   }

   console.log("Counted: " + arrayLength + " primes");
}
share|improve this answer
    
Horrible answer but gave me a chuckle... +1 –  sachleen Oct 12 '12 at 4:49
    
I may have misunderstood the question, but your answer gives the primes of values <100, not the first 100 prime numbers. ;-) –  Mike Oct 12 '12 at 4:50
1  
@Mike Yes but if you look at the code above that is what it does too. –  Aran Mulholland Oct 12 '12 at 4:52
    
...Simplest answer here thoough! –  Aran Mulholland Oct 12 '12 at 4:55
add comment

First, you really don't need to use === for this. The standard == will suffice. Second, you can make all of those lines that are the same thing, except for a single digit into one line:

var primes=4; 
for (var counter = 2; counter <= 100; counter = counter + 1)
{
    var isPrime = 0;
    if(isPrime == 0){ 
        if(counter == 2 || counter == 3 ||counter == 5 || counter == 7)console.log(counter);
        else if(counter % 2 == 0 || counter % 3 == 0 || counter % 5 == 0 || counter % 7 == 0)isPrime=0; 
        else {
            console.log(counter);
            primes = primes + 1;
        }
    }
}
console.log("Counted: "+primes+" primes");

You'll also notice that the {} was removed on a few lines. This is because a single line of code following an if (among others) is always considered nested.

Next, we can change your primes = primes + 1; to this: primes++; which just tells primes to increment itself by one. The same can be done for your counter. We also know that isPrime equals "0" because you set it to that a second ago, so we no longer need that if statement:

var primes=4; 
for (var counter = 2; counter <= 100; counter++)
{
    var isPrime = 0;
    if(counter == 2 || counter == 3 ||counter == 5 || counter == 7)console.log(counter);
    else if(counter % 2 == 0 || counter % 3 == 0 || counter % 5 == 0 || counter % 7 == 0)isPrime=0; 
    else {
        console.log(counter);
        primes++;
    }
}
console.log("Counted: "+primes+" primes");

Next, we can do a negative check (!= instead of ==) on the values and combine your else if with your else. Since we're doing a negative check (for this case) we have to switch the ORs (||) to ANDs (&&):

var primes=4; 
for (var counter = 2; counter <= 100; counter++)
{
    if(counter == 2 || counter == 3 ||counter == 5 || counter == 7)console.log(counter);
    else if(counter % 2 != 0 && counter % 3 != 0 && counter % 5 != 0 && counter % 7 != 0) {
        console.log(counter);
        primes++;
    }
}
console.log("Counted: "+primes+" primes");

There are many other ways to write it, but I felt it more beneficial to you to use what you started with and shorten it from there.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a really good answer! Thanks a bunch for guiding me step by step. I wish I could select two best answers. –  RufioLJ Oct 12 '12 at 5:05
1  
You're right that == will work, but there's nothing wrong with === and it's often a good practice. –  icktoofay Oct 13 '12 at 2:10
    
@RufioLJ You can also accept this one instead... –  ring0 Oct 16 '12 at 4:41
    
always use the === –  Aran Mulholland Oct 26 '12 at 5:15
add comment

Of course "simpler" is not defined. :-)

The following can be made much shorter, but has a bit of robustness built in.

// Get primes from 0 to n. 
// n must be < 2^53
function primeSieve(n) {

  n = Number(n);
  if (n > Math.pow(2, 53) || isNaN(n) || n < 1) {
    return;
  }

  var primes = [];
  var notPrimes = {};
  var num;

  for (var i=2; i<n; i++) {
    for (var j=2; j<n/2; j++) {
      num = i*j;
      notPrimes[num] = num;
    }
    if (!(i in notPrimes)) {
      primes.push(i);
    }
  }
  return primes
} 

So if you want less code:

// Get primes from 0 to n. 
// n must be < 2^53
function primeSieve2(n) {
  var primes = [], notPrimes = {};
  for (var i=2; i<n; i++) { 
    for (var j=2; j<n/2; j++)
      notPrimes[i*j] = i*j;
    i in notPrimes? 0 : primes.push(i);
  }
  return primes
}
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This is pretty simple (I mean, short):

console.log(2); console.log(3);
var m5=25, m7=49, i=5, d=2, c=2;
for( ; i<100; i+=d, d=6-d )
{
    if( i!=m5 && i!=m7) { console.log(i); c+=1; }
    if( m5 <= i ) m5+=10;
    if( m7 <= i ) m7+=14;
}
c

It is an "unrolled" sieve of Eratosthenes with 2-3-wheel factorization.

On the one hand, we enumerate all the numbers below 100 (and bigger than 3) that are coprime with 2 and 3, as partial sums of 5+2+4+2+4+... , so that there are no multiples of 2 and 3 among thus enumerated numbers.

On the other hand, we discard from among them all the multiples of 5 and 7, by enumerating them as partial sums of 25+10+10+10+... and 49+14+14+14+... . Multiples of 2 and 3 are not there in the first place, and the first multiple of 11 that needs to be discarded by the sieve of Eratosthenes is 121.

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This will be simpler for your Question....

 for (int i = 2; i < 100; i++) {
int j = 0;
for (j = 2; j < i; j++)
    if ((i % j) == 0)break;
        if (i == j)
        System.out.print("  " + i);}
share|improve this answer
1  
-1 Poorly formatted code. Even though it's not required, it's good practice to have braces anyway. Question is tagged javascript, not java. –  sachleen Oct 13 '12 at 1:51
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