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I have an assignment to write a Stacks class using a list and a Queue class using two Stacks. I've completed the assignment, but running the valgrind I find that I have a memory leak in the following code:

T Stack<T>::pop()
{
    T *n = new T;
    *n = myStack.front();
    myStack.pop_front();
    return *n;
}

I can't delete the pointer after I return it so I'm not sure how to fix it. Thanks in advance.

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7 Answers 7

Why do you even need to use new? You can make a copy of the stack's top value like this:

T Stack<T>::pop()
{
    T n = myStack.front();
    myStack.pop_front();
    return n;
}

So there are no allocations and no leaks;

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I actually tried this, but it didn't work at the time. Probably was careless and mistyped something. Works now though, thanks for the help everyone! –  user1740222 Oct 12 '12 at 6:59
1  
Note that this is only strongly exception-safe if move-constructing a T is a no-throw operation. If it can throw (or if T only has a throwing copy-constructor), then you could lose the data in the T if the copy in to the return value fails. If you want this operation to be no-throw (for reasonable T), then change the first line to T n{std::move(myStack.front())}; –  Mankarse Oct 12 '12 at 7:58

Make a copy and then clear the memory if any inside pop_front.

    T Stack<T>::pop()
    {
        T ret = myStack.front();
        myStack.pop_front();        
        return ret;
    }
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You should have rather used

T n = myStack.front();
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On your place, I would stop using raw pointers and change to shared_ptr. Is is much safer.

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You've got multiple answers giving the correct code, but the reason your existing code was wrong goes something like this:

T Stack<T>::pop()
{
    T *n = new T;          // allocates dynamic memory
    *n = myStack.front();  // reference to T from front() copied to allocated T object
    myStack.pop_front();   // removes the T in the stack
    return *n;  // copies your allocated T object to the return value
    // your pointer variable goes out of scope, that address is stored nowhere,
    // this is where the leak occurs...
} 
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T *n = new T; you are creating T using new and not using it. that is the problem.

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Copying semantics is one of the biggest strengths of C++, because you can put the compiler and the author of type ´T´ to blame:

T Stack<T>::pop() // may throw
{
    T ret = myStack.front();
    myStack.pop_front();
    return ret;
}

Note though that this is a sub-ideal form of a pop-function. Upon copying, an exception might be thrown, which makes implementing an exception safe pop-function essentially impossible.

The container std::stack<> solves by making the return type void:

void Stack<T>::pop() // no-throw [if T is written by a sane coder]
{        
    myStack.pop_front();
}

T Stack<T>::back() // may throw
{        
    return myStack.front();
}

This provides you with a mean to clean up your stack upon destruction without throwing exceptions (throwing destructors in C++ is, by convention (not by the standard), forbidden).

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