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see the below code

source = $("<root><item desc='SQL'/><item desc='Microsoft'/><item desc='Action Script'><item desc='Java script'></root>")

//WAY 1: This way is not working...
source.children().sort(function(a, b)
    {
        var aText = $(a).attr("desc").toLowerCase();
        var bText = $(b).attr("desc").toLowerCase();

        if(aText == bText)
            return 0;

        return aText > bText ? 1 : -1;
    });

alert(source[0].outerHTML);

//WAY 2: This is working...
var temp = source.children();

temp.sort(function(a, b)
    {
        var aText = $(a).attr("desc").toLowerCase();
        var bText = $(b).attr("desc").toLowerCase();

        if(aText == bText)
            return 0;

        return aText > bText ? 1 : -1;
    });

source = $("<root/>");
source.append(temp);

alert(source[0].outerHTML);

way 1 is not working, way 2 is working good. why should i assign children to another variable and then sort, assign them back to original variable? Is this right and efficient way?

you can try this FIDDLE....

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why you guys are down vote it? is this question not clear Or not showing any research work? –  user10 Oct 12 '12 at 8:16
    
Saw your qn on meta.so meta.stackexchange.com/questions/158160/… - I've voted up a couple of your posts, but not this one: you need to say what you expected from way #1 and what you saw, otherwise you are asking too much of people trying to answer the qn. You are lucky to have the answer you do. Try fixing the qn and I'll upvote it. Shouldn't be long before you are unbanned. –  Charles Stewart Dec 10 '12 at 9:36
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1 Answer 1

The order of the children in the jQuery collection has nothing to do with the order of the children as XML nodes. In the jQuery collection they're just pointers to the nodes. In your second example, you're adding them to a new root in their new order.

An analogy: Imagine you've got a bunch of baseball players, and their baseball cards. You line up the baseball players in batting order, and then you line up their cards in the same order as the players.

In your first example, you're just sorting the baseball cards. The players themselves don't move.

In your second example, you sort the cards, and then you tell the players to move to a new line in the same order that you've sorted the cards into.

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