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I have a struct:

struct numbers_struct {
char numbers_array[1000];
};

struct numbers_struct numbers[some_size];

After creating struct, there is an integer number as an input:

scanf("%d",&size);

I need to use malloc(size) and specify the size of the array numbers. (instead of some_size use size)

Is something like this possible in C?

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VLA is not there in C, rather use calloc –  perilbrain Oct 12 '12 at 7:36
    
@perilbrain: What does everybody have with calloc? The only practical difference from malloc is that it initializes the memory. –  Jan Hudec Oct 12 '12 at 7:38
    
@JanHudec:- and what about array??? –  perilbrain Oct 12 '12 at 7:40
    
@perilbrain: No, C does not have variable length arrays. But the question already mentions malloc. –  Jan Hudec Oct 12 '12 at 7:42
4  
@JanHudec, VLAs were introducted in C99. –  hmjd Oct 12 '12 at 7:45
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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

May be you can do like this

 struct numbers_struct {
char numbers_array[1000];
};

scanf("%d",&size);

struct numbers_struct *numbers = malloc(sizeof(numbers_struct) * size);
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If this is Pure C, you need to write sizeof(struct numbers_struct). Struct names are automatically typedef in C++ only. Or you have to create a typedef in c while defining the structure –  fayyazkl Oct 12 '12 at 7:50
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Yes it is but malloc() require the total amount of memory require for the array, not the number of elements:

struct numbers_struct* numbers = malloc(size * sizeof(*numbers));
if (numbers)
{
}

Note that you must check the return value of scanf() before using size (which is a poor name in this case) otherwise the code could be using an uninitialized variable if scanf() fails:

int number_of_elements;
if (1 == scanf("%d", &number_of_elements))
{
    struct numbers_struct* numbers =
        malloc(number_of_elements * sizeof(*numbers));
    if (numbers)
    {
        free(numbers); /* Remember to release allocated memory
                          when no longer required. */
    }
}

Variable length arrays were introduced in C99 but there are restrictions around their use (they cannot be used at file scope for example).

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See "calloc" and "alloc" and "realloc" usages in the docs.

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What does everybody have with calloc? The only practical difference from malloc is that it initializes the memory. –  Jan Hudec Oct 12 '12 at 7:38
    
@JanHudec: #1: Initialization is useful sometimes. #2: Readability - it makes it clear that you allocate N elements of size S. #3: malloc(n*m) behaves weird if n*m overflows, while calloc(n,m) would fail nicely. –  ugoren Oct 12 '12 at 7:42
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#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int  main(void){
    struct numbers_struct {
        char numbers_array[1000];
    };

    int size = 10;
    int i;
    struct numbers_struct *s= malloc(size * sizeof(struct numbers_struct));

    for (i=0;i<size;i++){
        snprintf(s[i].numbers_array, 20, "test index %d", i);
    }

    for (i=0;i<size;i++){
        printf("%s\n", s[i].numbers_array);
    }

    free(s);
}
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No need to cast the result of malloc. –  Alex Reynolds Oct 12 '12 at 9:41
    
bad habit, edited and changed –  JosiP Oct 12 '12 at 10:31
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VLA is possible in C99.

you can do it

int main()
{
char *p;//I have used char you can use any pointer
int k;
scanf("%d",&k);
p=malloc(k);//just allocated the memory and given the  memory address to p

//after use 
free(p);
}

It will compile without any error.

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