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I am working on a chess application and need to create opening book, a file which could contains a millions of moves and positions. we have 64 squres, some of which have occupied by pieces while some are empty. Let we represent our pieces with following bits (using to Huffman encoding technique).

              White          Black
-Empty        0

-Pawn         110           100

-Rook         11111         11110

-Knight       10110         10101

-Bishop       10100         11100

-Queen        111010        111011

-King         101110        101111

At initial position, we have 32 squres occupied by different pieces and 32 squres are empty. for efficiency I have to store position in consecutive bits. Pieces bits will be placed in bit array in sequential order, starting from a1 square, then a2 square,..a8, then b1, b2...b8 square and so on.

So for a starting position this equates to 32 x 1 + 16 x 3 + 12 x 5 + 4 x 6 = 164 bits.

Also some additional 16 more bits are required for different game situation, like whether castling is enabled or not, and defined enpassant square if applicable. so I need about 180 bits (or 23 bytes = 184 bits) to store a single position for chessboard.

Now the problem is that I have to perform some bitwise operations, and so want to know the scheme how could I manipulate this in my code and also how to store in file. means which data strucure should I use. e.g. maximum long (data type) will contains only 4 bytes = 64 bits. and i want to avoid using string. Could any body suggest any idea how to proceed with this.

I am using C#.Net, Framework 3.5.

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4  
4 bytes = 32 bits. –  Sani Huttunen Oct 12 '12 at 7:45
1  
If you're modeling a standard game of chess, why not a tree (where each branch is a possible move)? You could reduce each state of an opening sequence to 11-12 bits (though i'd go with 16 for efficiency's sake) if you only store the difference between it and the previous state. –  cHao Oct 12 '12 at 7:52
    
I'd like to answer but I don't think my answer would ever be accepted. –  Jodrell Oct 12 '12 at 8:05
    
@Jodrell, great comments, thanks. –  Muhammad Idrees Oct 12 '12 at 11:52
    
You could also close any question where the answer you wanted was not related to the question you asked, for example stackoverflow.com/questions/9362184/… –  Jodrell Oct 16 '12 at 13:22

4 Answers 4

For an opening book you could use this approach;

For every board generate a good 64bit hashcode (google zobrist hashing)

Have a dictionary where you use the hashcode as the key.

So you do not store the actual board. If the hashcode matches you can assume it is an identical board (the chances of a 64bit collision start after something like the fifteenth decimal). As final check test whether the opening move is allowed on the board and you are good to go.

Then write code to save the dictionary as a whole. This code does that and works for all enumerable containers;

 // save
 using (var fs = new FileStream(fileName, FileMode.Create))
        {
            var bw = new BinaryWriter(fs);
            foreach (var kvp in this)
            {
                kvp.Key.AddToStream(bw);
                kvp.Value.AddToStream(bw);
            }
        }

 // load
 using (var fs = new FileStream(fileName, FileMode.Open))
            {
                var fslen = fs.Length;
                var br = new BinaryReader(fs);
                while (fs.Position < fslen)
                {
                    var k = new Pattern();
                    var v = new BestMove();
                    k.ReadFromStream(br);
                    v.ReadFromStream(br);
                    Add(k, v);
                }
            }

This is how to generate the 64-bit Zobrist hashes. These should be stored in some permanent place so that they can later be reused in the code method shown at the bottom of this answer. Here they're stored as static members of a static class:

internal static class HashKeys
{
    internal static readonly UInt64[,] PieceSquareKeys = new UInt64[64,16];
    internal static readonly UInt64[] EnPassantKeys = new UInt64[64];
    internal static readonly UInt64 SideToMoveKey;
    internal static readonly UInt64 WhiteCastlingKingSideKey;
    internal static readonly UInt64 WhiteCastlingQueenSideKey;
    internal static readonly UInt64 BlackCastlingKingSideKey;
    internal static readonly UInt64 BlackCastlingQueenSideKey;

    // Constructor - generates pseudo-random numbers for Zobrist hashing.
    // The use of a CSPRNG is a good guaranteee of genuinely random numbers.
    static HashKeys()
    {
        RNGCryptoServiceProvider randomGenerator = new RNGCryptoServiceProvider();
        byte[] eightRandomBytes = new byte[8];

        try
        {
            for (Int32 i1 = 0; i1 < 64; i1++)
            {
                for (Int32 i2 = 0; i1 < 16; i1++)
                {
                    randomGenerator.GetBytes(eightRandomBytes);
                    PieceSquareKeys[i1, i2] = BitConverter.ToUInt64(eightRandomBytes, 0);
                }
                randomGenerator.GetBytes(eightRandomBytes);
                EnPassantKeys[i1] = BitConverter.ToUInt64(eightRandomBytes, 0);
            }

            randomGenerator.GetBytes(eightRandomBytes);
            SideToMoveKey = BitConverter.ToUInt64(eightRandomBytes, 0);
            randomGenerator.GetBytes(eightRandomBytes);
            WhiteCastlingKingSideKey = BitConverter.ToUInt64(eightRandomBytes, 0);

            randomGenerator.GetBytes(eightRandomBytes);
            WhiteCastlingQueenSideKey = BitConverter.ToUInt64(eightRandomBytes, 0);

            randomGenerator.GetBytes(eightRandomBytes);
            BlackCastlingKingSideKey = BitConverter.ToUInt64(eightRandomBytes, 0);

            randomGenerator.GetBytes(eightRandomBytes);
            BlackCastlingQueenSideKey = BitConverter.ToUInt64(eightRandomBytes, 0);
        }
        finally
        {
            randomGenerator.Dispose();
        }
    }
}

This is how to generate a 64-bit Zobrish hash representing a board position (including side to move, castling rights, en-passant, etc:

// Init Zobrist position hash, used in transposition table and draw detection.
// This will be incrementally updated during move make/unmake.
internal static UInt64 InitPositionHash(byte[] squares, ComplexProperties propertyStore, byte sideToMove)
{
    UInt64 positionHash = 0;

    // Calculate piece/square hashes.
    for (Int32 i = 0; i < 64; i++)
    {
        if (squares[i] != Constants.EMPTY)
        {
            positionHash ^= HashKeys.PieceSquareKeys[i, squares[i]];
        }
    }

    // Add side to move only if Black.
    if (sideToMove == Constants.BLACK)
    {
        positionHash ^= HashKeys.SideToMoveKey;
    }

    // Add en-passant square if applicable.
    if (propertyStore.EpSquare != 0)
    {
        positionHash ^= HashKeys.EnPassantKeys[propertyStore.EpSquare];
    }

    // White castling.
    switch (propertyStore.WhiteCastlingStatus)
    {
        case Constants.EnumCastlingStatus.CAN_CASTLE_BOTH:
             positionHash ^= HashKeys.WhiteCastlingKingSideKey;
             positionHash ^= HashKeys.WhiteCastlingQueenSideKey;
             break;
        case Constants.EnumCastlingStatus.CAN_CASTLE_OO:
             positionHash ^= HashKeys.WhiteCastlingKingSideKey;
             break;
        case Constants.EnumCastlingStatus.CAN_CASTLE_OOO:
             positionHash ^= HashKeys.WhiteCastlingQueenSideKey;
             break;
        case Constants.EnumCastlingStatus.CANT_CASTLE:
             break;
        default:
             Debug.Assert(false, "White has an invalid castling status!");
             break;
    }

    // Black castling.
    switch (propertyStore.BlackCastlingStatus)
    {
        case Constants.EnumCastlingStatus.CAN_CASTLE_BOTH:
             positionHash ^= HashKeys.BlackCastlingKingSideKey;
             positionHash ^= HashKeys.BlackCastlingQueenSideKey;
             break;
        case Constants.EnumCastlingStatus.CAN_CASTLE_OO:
             positionHash ^= HashKeys.BlackCastlingKingSideKey;
             break;
        case Constants.EnumCastlingStatus.CAN_CASTLE_OOO:
             positionHash ^= HashKeys.BlackCastlingQueenSideKey;
             break;
        case Constants.EnumCastlingStatus.CANT_CASTLE:
             break;
        default:
             Debug.Assert(false, "Black has an invalid castling status!");
             break;
    }

    return positionHash;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think your approach is the best for tracking book positions so I updated it with some useful Zobrist-related code. –  RoadWarrior Oct 15 '12 at 14:30
    
@RoadWarrior: Thanx. He will need to store the randomhashkeys though after generating them once using your code. If you save the openingbook with these hashes, after loading the openingsbook again he will need the same hashes to find anything in the book. –  IvoTops Oct 15 '12 at 16:52
    
That's correct. In my code they're stored as static members of a static class which works over a single run. Clearly long-term storage is also needed. –  RoadWarrior Oct 15 '12 at 17:52
    
+1 This is the correct approach; you don't store a chess position in an opening book (you can assume all moves in the tree start from the standard opening position). –  trojanfoe Oct 18 '12 at 11:15

For Chess Applications the most commonly used structure is this;

  • a ulong 64bit variable where each bit represent a position on the board
  • Seperate variables for each colors pawns, knigths etc.

so

ulong WHITE_PAWNS = xxx;
ulong BLACK_PAWNS = xxx;

etc.

This is not the most storage efficient version, but enables you to do a lot of stuff very quick. To get pawns and knights together you can do

white_pawns_and_knights = WHITE_PAWNS | WHITE_KNIGHTS;

Read more about it here (among other places).

I have written a chess program of my own (in Delphi and partly C#) and there is tons of good stuff out there. These were the bookmarks I kept on the subject;

I also have a C# unit for fast bit manipulation on ulongs if you want it. Mail me at ivotops#gmail#com if you want that and feel free to ask away.

Unfortunately I had too little time and never finished the C# version ;-)

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During runtime you can use BitArray class. It's very efficient since you can store custom size bit arrays

Updated

Save BitArray to file:

private void save()
{
    BitArray bits = new BitArray(164, true);
    byte[] bytes = new byte[21]; // 21 * 8 bits = 168 bits (last 4 bits are unused)
    bits.CopyTo(bytes, 0);
    for (int i = 0; i < 21; i++)
    {
        bytes[i] = ToByte(bits, i);
    }

    // now save your byte array to file
}

private byte ToByte(BitArray bits, int start) 
{
    int sum = 0;

    if (bits[start])
        sum += 8;

    if (bits[start + 1])
        sum += 4;

    if (bits[start + 2])
        sum += 2;

    if (bits[start + 3])
        sum += 1;

    return Convert.ToByte(sum);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Mohsen, could you kindly provide any sample code, how to store it in file. and also read back. –  Muhammad Idrees Oct 12 '12 at 8:03

I would go for at BitArray. It is specialized in bit manipulation but wrappes the operations.

But it sounds like your needs are sufficiently specialized that it could be relevant to implement the collection you self.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for quick response, yes i have reviewed for it. but having no idea, how will i store it in file. and also it supports method assuming on single byte boundaries. but i need consecutive 180 bits without worrying about byte boundaries while playing with bitwise operators (but definitely at lower end, these will be treated as bytes, but i dont want to be limited myself with these boundaries while coding) . For example, i want to manipulate, last 2 bits from first byte and first 3 bits from second byte. –  Muhammad Idrees Oct 12 '12 at 8:01
    
You can access the bites individually by the index operator byteArray[3] = false; byteArray[129] = true; etc. The class is [Serializable] so you can store it directly in a compact datafile using standard .NET serialization: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms973893.aspx. –  faester Oct 12 '12 at 8:08

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