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I found the following code in a JS project:

var a = new Array();
a[0] = 0;
for (var b = 0; b < 10; b++) {
  a[0] |= b; 
}

What does the |= do in the body of the for loop?

The code example is dubious, but has been presented here by V8 for an example of improved performance.

Updated Example

The above example is equivalent to var a = [15]; for most intents and purposes. A more realistic example for the |= operator would be to set up binary flags in a single variable, for example on a permission object:

//Set up permission masks
var PERMISSION_1_MASK = parseInt('0001',2);
var PERMISSION_2_MASK = parseInt('0010',2);
..

//Set up permissions
userPermissions = 0;
userPermissions |= hasPermissionOne && PERMISSION_1_MASK;
userPermissions |= hasPermissionTwo && PERMISSION_2_MASK;
..

//Use permissions
if(userPermissions & PERMISSION_1_MASK){
    ..//Do stuff only allowed by permission 1
}
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I just realize that the code it's from here. html5rocks.com/en/tutorials/speed/v8 –  razpeitia Oct 13 '12 at 3:10
2  
@razpeitia read the question and you'll find that URL... –  ContentiousMaximus Oct 13 '12 at 7:19

5 Answers 5

up vote 65 down vote accepted
a[0] |= b

is basically

a[0] = a[0] | b

"|" is an or bitwise operator (by the way: The MDN docs are really well written and really clear. If the OP is wanting to write and understand JS, then the MDN docs are a great resource.)

Update When a[0] is assigned 0, a[0] in binary is 0000. In the loop,

  1. b = 0

    a[0] = 0 (base 10) = 0000 (base 2)
    b    = 0 (base 10) = 0000 (base 2)
                       ---------------
    a[0] | b           = 0000 (base 2) = 0 (base 10)
    
  2. b = 1

    a[0] = 0 (base 10) = 0000 (base 2)
    b    = 1 (base 10) = 0001 (base 2)
                       ---------------
    a[0] | b           = 0001 (base 2) = 1 (base 10)
    
  3. b = 2

    a[0] = 1 (base 10) = 0001 (base 2)
    b    = 2 (base 10) = 0010 (base 2)
                       ---------------
    a[0] | b           = 0011 (base 2) = 3 (base 10)
    
  4. b = 3

    a[0] = 3 (base 10) = 0011 (base 2)
    b    = 3 (base 10) = 0011 (base 2)
                       ---------------
    a[0] | b           = 0011 (base 2) = 3 (base 10)
    
  5. b = 4

    a[0] = 3 (base 10) = 0011 (base 2)
    b    = 4 (base 10) = 0100 (base 2)
                       ---------------
    a[0] | b           = 0111 (base 2) = 7 (base 10)
    
  6. b = 5

    a[0] = 7 (base 10) = 0111 (base 2)
    b    = 5 (base 10) = 0101 (base 2)
                       ---------------
    a[0] | b           = 0111 (base 2) = 7 (base 10)
    
  7. b = 6

    a[0] = 7 (base 10) = 0111 (base 2)
    b    = 6 (base 10) = 0110 (base 2)
                       ---------------
    a[0] | b           = 0111 (base 2) = 7 (base 10)
    
  8. b = 7

    a[0] = 7 (base 10) = 0111 (base 2)
    b    = 7 (base 10) = 0111 (base 2)
                       ---------------
    a[0] | b           = 0111 (base 2) = 7 (base 10)
    
  9. b = 8

    a[0] = 7 (base 10) = 0111 (base 2)
    b    = 8 (base 10) = 1000 (base 2)
                       ---------------
    a[0] | b           = 1111 (base 2) = 15 (base 10)
    
  10. b = 9

    a[0] = 15 (base 10) = 1111 (base 2)
    b    =  9 (base 10) = 1001 (base 2)
                        ---------------
    a[0] | b            = 1111 (base 2) = 15 (base 10)
    

At the end of the loop the value of a[0] is 15

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21  
+1 for stepping through the loop –  WildlyInaccurate Oct 12 '12 at 12:12
    
@kidmenot: Awesome, thanks. –  ContentiousMaximus Oct 12 '12 at 12:51
    
@user1638092 glad to be of help :) –  kidmenot Oct 12 '12 at 13:07
3  
And just to make it explicit, steps 4, 6, 7, 8, and 10 are all redundant, so this loop is a bad example of performance gains... –  Izkata Oct 12 '12 at 18:06
x |= y;

is equivalent to

x = x | y;

where | stands for bitwise OR.

share|improve this answer
    
Is there an idiomatic meaning? Or some trick, like when you floor down floats with ~~? –  katspaugh Oct 12 '12 at 8:59
1  
@katspaugh There is. For example it can be used for efficient encoding and checking for privileges ( this would fit with OP code as well ). Read this article. –  freakish Oct 12 '12 at 9:11
1  
@katspaugh what did u mean by "floor down floats with ~~"? I have never heard of such a thing! –  kidmenot Oct 12 '12 at 11:16
1  
@kidmenot, see stackoverflow.com/q/5971645/352796. –  katspaugh Oct 12 '12 at 12:18

It works kind of like this if b is greater than a, b is added to a.

What happens in reality is a = a | b, just as for other operators. This means a = a BITWISE OR b which is explained here.

For instance, this is the result of a few operations:

var a = 1;
a |= 2; // a = 3
a |= 2; // a = 3
a |= 4; // a = 7

I hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
not sure: b:0 a[0]:0 b:1 a[0]:1 b:2 a[0]:3 b:3 a[0]:3 b:4 a[0]:7 b:5 a[0]:7 b:6 a[0]:7 b:7 a[0]:7 b:8 a[0]:15 b:9 a[0]:15 –  ContentiousMaximus Oct 12 '12 at 8:20
    
This should be a correct explenation although the some others have explained it more throughly. –  Pablo Karlsson Oct 12 '12 at 11:39

As with most assignment operators, it is equivalent to applying the operator using the lefthand value again:

a |= b
a = a | b

Just like

a += b
a = a + b

Look on Moz Dev Net for more.

[Edit: Brain fail, mixed up | and ||. Need more coffee. Modified below]

Since | is the Bitwise OR operator, the result of a|b will be the integer representing the bitstring with all the 1 bits of a and b. Note that javascript has no native int or bitstring types, so it will first cast a and b to int, then do a bitwise OR on the bits. So 9 | 2 in binary is 1001 | 0010 = 1011, which is 11, but 8|2 = 8.

The effect is to add the flag bits of b into a. So if you have some flag WEEVILFLAG=parseInt(00001000,2) :

// a = parseInt(01100001,2)
if(isWeevilish(a))
    a |= WEEVILFLAG;
// now a = parseInt(01101001,2)

will set that bit to 1 in a.

share|improve this answer
1  
So this is the same as the logical or? Eg. var a = "title" || x –  ContentiousMaximus Oct 12 '12 at 8:24
3  
You are confusing logical OR and bitwise OR. –  katspaugh Oct 12 '12 at 8:27
1  
Bah. Bitwise OR not logical OR. Brains are funny things. Fixed now. –  Phil H Oct 12 '12 at 8:41

Returns a one in each bit position for which the corresponding bits of either or both operands are ones.

Code: result = a | b;

^ is the bitwise XOR operator, which returns a one for each position where one (not both) of the corresponding bits of its operands is a one. The next example returns 4 (0100):

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