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I now understand we can't deserialize an unknown type.

However, to create efficient code I don't want to create a method to deserialise which has X amount of overloads for the different types.

EG, my method signature could be these (an ever growing list)

static void deserialiseThis(Dog d)
        {
            Stream reader = new FileStream(@"C:\Documents and Settings\Name\Desktop\demo.xml", FileMode.Open);
            System.Xml.Serialization.XmlSerializer xs = new System.Xml.Serialization.XmlSerializer(d.GetType());
            Dog d = (Dog)xs.Deserialize(reader);
            DoSomethingDoggy(d);
        }

static void deserialiseThis(Cat t)
        {
//again but for cat
        }


static void deserialiseThis(Mouse t)
        {
//again but for mouse
        }

It seems neater to do this

static void deserialiseThis<T>(T t)
        {
            //logic
        }

or

static void deserialiseThis(Type t)
    {
        //logic
    }

The issue with this method though is I can't instantiate an object using T. However, I can work out what the type is.

Is this an ideal time to use the Factory Pattern?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It could be something like this

T Deserialize<T>(Stream s)
{
    XmlSerializer ser = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));
    return (T)ser.Deserialize(s);
}
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I like following approach to this problem. Hope you can make some use of it.

You can use this to get XContainer out of your stream:

using (var streamReader = new StreamReader(yourStream))
{
    var xDocument = XDocument.Load(streamReader);
    return xDocument;
}

And than you have very nice extension method:

public static class XContainerExtensions
{
    public static T Deserialize<T>(this XContainer xmlDocument)
    {
        var xmlSerializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));

        using (var reader = xmlDocument.CreateReader())
        {
            return (T)xmlSerializer.Deserialize(reader);
        }
    }
}

Which can be used like this:

var dog = xDocument.Deserialize<Dog>();
share|improve this answer
    
Although I like the idea of turning this to an extension method, I can't get your example to work - the extension method doesn't exist when I copy and paste your code. –  Dave Oct 12 '12 at 9:08
    
Extension method should be located in separate static class. (I've edited my answer) –  Andriy Buday Oct 12 '12 at 11:22

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