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I am reading Programming Priciples and Practice Using C++ chapter 17-19, and trying to write my version of Vector. This is my code:

#include <stdexcept>
#include <exception>

using namespace std;

struct Range_error:out_of_range{
    int index;
    Range_error(int i):out_of_range("Range error"),index(i){}
};

template<class T, class A = allocator<T>> struct Vector_base{
    A alloc;
    T* elem;
    int sz;                                                     // number of elements
    int space;                                                  // number of elements plus "free space"/"slots" for new elements("the current allocation")

    void copy(const Vector_base& arg)
    {
        T* p = alloc.allocate(arg.sz);
        for(int i=0; i<arg.sz; ++i) alloc.construct(&p[i], arg.elem[i]);
        elem = p;
        sz = arg.sz;
        space = arg.space;
    };

    Vector_base(): elem(alloc.allocate(0)), sz(0), space(0) {};
    Vector_base(int n):elem(alloc.allocate(n)), sz(n), space(n) {};
    Vector_base(const A& a, int n):alloc(a), elem(a.allocate(n)), sz(n), space(n){};
    Vector_base(const Vector_base& arg) {copy(arg);}
    ~Vector_base() {alloc.deallocate(elem, space);}
};

template<class T, class A = allocator<T>> class Vector : private Vector_base<T,A>{
public:
    Vector() : Vector_base(){};
    Vector(int n) : Vector_base(n) {for(int i=0; i<this->sz; ++i) this->alloc.construct(&this->elem[i], T());}
    Vector(const Vector& arg) : Vector_base(arg) {};
    Vector& operator=(const Vector&);

    ~Vector() {};

    int size() const {return this->sz;}
    int capacity() const {return this->space;}

    void resize(int newsize, T val=T());
    void push_back(const T& val);
    void pop_back();                                                // delete the last element
    void reserve(int newalloc);

    T& operator[](unsigned int n) 
    {
        return this->elem[n];   
    }

    const T& operator[](unsigned int n) const 
    {
        return this->elem[n];   
    }

    T& at(unsigned int n)
    {
        if(n<0 || this->sz<=n) throw Range_error(n);
        return this->elem[n];
    }

    const T& at(unsigned int n) const
    {
        if(n<0 || this->sz<=n) throw Range_error(n);
        return this->elem[n];
    }
};

template<class T, class A> void Swap(Vector_base<T,A>& a, Vector_base<T,A>& b){
    Vector_base<T,A> c(a);
    a=b;
    b=c;
}

template<class T, class A> Vector<T,A>& Vector<T,A>::operator=(const Vector<T,A>& a)
{
    if(this == &a) return *this;                                    // self-assignment, no work needed

    if(a.sz<=sz){
        for(int i=0; i<a.sz; ++i) elem[i] = a.elem[i];
        sz=a.sz;
        return *this;
    }

    T* p = new T[a.sz];
    for(int i=0; i<a.sz; ++i) p[i] = a.elem[i];
    delete elem;
    elem=p;
    space=sz = a.sz;
    return *this;

}

template<class T, class A> void Vector<T,A>::reserve(int newalloc)
{
    if(newalloc <= this->space) return;
    Vector_base<T,A> b(this->alloc,newalloc);
    for(int i=0; i<this->sz; ++i) this->alloc.construct(&b.elem[i], this->elem[i]);     // copy
    for(int i=0; i<this->sz; ++i) this->alloc.destroy(&this->elem[i]);

    Swap<Vector_base<T,A>>(*this, b);
    this->space = newalloc;
}

template<class T, class A> void Vector<T,A>::resize(int newsize, T val=T())
{
    reserve(newsize);
    for(int i=this->sz; i<newsize; ++i) this->alloc.construct(&this->elem[i], val);
    for(int i=newsize; i<this->sz; ++i) this->alloc.destroy(&this->elem[i]);
    this->sz = newsize;
}

template<class T, class A> void Vector<T,A>::push_back(const T& val)
{
    if(this->space == 0) reserve(8);
    else if(this->sz == this->space) reserve(2*(this->space));
    this->alloc.construct(&this->elem[this->sz], val);
    ++(this->sz);
}

template<class T, class A> void Vector<T,A>::pop_back()
{
    if(this->sz == 0) return;
    this->alloc.destroy(&this->elem[--(this->sz)]);
    if(this->sz <= (this->space)/2)
    {
        Vector_base<T,A> b(this->alloc,(this->space)/2);
        for(int i=0; i<this->sz; ++i) this->alloc.construct(&b.elem[i], this->elem[i]);     // copy
        for(int i=0; i<this->sz; ++i) this->alloc.destroy(&this->elem[i]);

        Swap<Vector_base<T,A>>(*this, b);

        this->space /= 2;
    }
}

when it compiled, the vc++ says "void Swap(Vector_base &,Vector_base &)' : could not deduce template argument for 'Vector_base,A> &' from 'Vector'". I know that *this is a Vector object but b is Vector_base object, but that's the book says. How can I make this code work? Is there any memory leak of this code? Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
Your code is not exception safe -- it leaks memory if one constructor throws. –  Alexandre C. Oct 12 '12 at 11:25
    
Could you please make the question title more descriptive? –  Blastfurnace Oct 12 '12 at 15:04

2 Answers 2

Your Swap function template is defined as template<class T, class A>. So you should call it like: Swap<T,A>(*this, b); instead of Swap<Vector_base<T,A>>(*this, b);

And actually, calling Swap<T,A>(*this, b) is not correct at all. You should allocate memory of the requested size and copy existing elements to the new space. Then release memory that you initially allocated.

The second problem is in:

Vector_base(const A& a, int n)
 : alloc(a), elem(a.allocate(n)), sz(n), space(n)

You cannot call a non-const member function on a const object. So, use alloc.allocate(n) instead of a.allocate(n).

Update 1

Also, you're still mixing new and delete operators with alloc.allocate() and alloc.deallocate() in the assignment operator of Vector.

Update 2

Your assignment operator will be never called in Swap<T, A> because you're actually working with Vector_base, while assignment operator is defined for Vector. So Memberwise assignment will happen.

template<class T, class A> void Swap(Vector_base<T,A>& a, Vector_base<T,A>& b){
    Vector_base<T,A> c(a);
    a=b;
    b=c;
}

That is b.elem and c.elem will point at the same address and alloc.deallocate will be called twice for it. Because first time ~Vector_base() will be called when c will go out of scope when Swap returns. And second time destructor will be called when b will go out of scope when reserve returns.

That's why you get an unhandled exception.

share|improve this answer
    
I have changed code like you says, but when it run, vc++ will notice me that "Unhandled exception at 0x776ae6c3 in vector.exe:0xC0000374: A heap has been corrupted." Call Stack shows msvcr100d.dll!_heap_alloc_base(unsigned int siza) Line 55 Language:C –  Tian Oct 12 '12 at 13:49
    
I have changed code like you says, but when it run, vc++ will notice me that "Unhandled exception at 0x776ae6c3 in vector.exe:0xC0000374: A heap has been corrupted." Call Stack shows msvcr100d.dll!_heap_alloc_base(unsigned int siza) Line 55 Language:C –  Tian Oct 12 '12 at 14:13
    
@user1247575 Well. Actually, calling Swap<T,A>(*this, b) is not correct at all. You should allocate memory of the requested size and copy existing elements to the new space. Then release memory that you initially allocated. –  Nikolay Khil Oct 12 '12 at 14:17

Is there any memory leak of this code?

Yes, there are memory leaks with your code. For instance:

void copy(const Vector_base& arg)
{
    T* p = alloc.allocate(arg.sz);
    for(int i=0; i<arg.sz; ++i) 
        alloc.construct(&p[i], arg.elem[i]); <--- what happens here
                                                  if construction fails ?
    elem = p;
    sz = arg.sz;
    space = arg.space;
};

If the copy constructor throws, you leak the allocated memory and whatever resource the already constructed objects are holding.

A cure is:

for (int i = 0; i < arg.sz; ++i)
{
    try { alloc.construct (&p[i], arg.elem[i]); }
    catch (...)
    {
        // 1) Destroy the allocated objects
        while (--i != 0) alloc.destroy (&p[i]);

        // 2) Release p
        alloc.deallocate (p, arg.sz);

        // 3) rethrow exception
        throw; 
    }
}

You have to do this consistently throughout the code, not only in the copy function. This is the number 1 reason why we use standard containers and not home-made ones.

For instance, exception safety is the reason why we have top and pop in std::stack: if there were only a pop method returning a copy of the object, what would happen if the copy construction throws an exception ?

If you want to implement your own containers (as an exercise or as a thoughtful decision), an excellent thing to do is to look at the implementation from your standard library. STL containers are templates, and all the code resides in the header files. Study it carefully, you'll learn many things.

share|improve this answer
    
you wrote while(--i != 0) alloc.destroy(&p[i]); the i isn't declared before, is it a right code? –  Tian Oct 12 '12 at 18:42
    
@user1247575: it's the i from the for loop. I want to destroy all the object which were allocated so far, not including the current one. –  Alexandre C. Oct 13 '12 at 9:09
    
I have tried all the code in gcc, but it says that a class can't have 2 template parameters. The code works fine in VC++. Why? –  Tian Oct 15 '12 at 19:50

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