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I have been using this for a while as a really nice workaround for how to declare static members for my objects but I really don't understand why they become static so I need somebody to explain to me the following behavior.

I have the following declarations:

// Primitive so nothing interesting here
Array.prototype.someMember = "My value is not static";
// Object containing a primitive, now this is the deal
Array.prototype.someOtherMember = {
    value: "My value is static"
};

Array.prototype.changeMember = function (newValue) {
    // Change the primitive value
    this.someMember = newValue;
    // Change the primitive value inside the object
    this.someOtherMember.value = newValue;
};

And if this is tested the following way:

var arr1 = [], arr2 = [], arr3 = [];
arr1.changeMember('I changed');
alert(arr1.someMember + ', ' + arr2.someMember + ', ' + arr3.someMember);
alert(arr1.someOtherMember.value + ', ' + arr2.someOtherMember.value + ', ' + arr3.someOtherMember.value);

The result is:

I changed, My value is not static, My value is not static

I changed, I changed, I changed

Now if I reassign the entire object in the changeMember method like this:

Array.prototype.changeMember = function (newValue) {
    // Change the primitive value
    this.someMember = newValue;
    // Change the object
    this.someOtherMember = { value: newValue };
};

Then someOtherMember is no longer static, but instead the first instance of Array gets its own. I don't understand the behavior because after all I am accessing someOtherMember through this in both cases, so I can't figure out why it's static in the first case and it's not static in the second.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There's no such thing as a static property in JS. What you're seeing is the normal behaviour of prototypal inheritance. The key concept is this: Arrays, and indeed all objects, are sparse An instance doesn't have a property unless it's explicitly assigned to that instance. as long as that doesn't happen, the prototype holds all properties:

The first case
Why are you seeing I changed, My value is not static, My value is not static? Simple: When arrays are instantiated, all instances will appear to have a property called someMember, but in fact, they don't. When you try to access anArray.someMember JS will first scan the instance for that property, if that instance doesn't have that property defined, JS will turn to the prototype and look for someMember there. In your snippet the changeMember method uses this, to refer to the instance that invokes the method, not Object.getPrototypeOf(this).someMember. The latter being the way to change the property on the prototype level. In short:

arr1.changeMember('I changed');
// is the same as doing:
arr1.someMember = 'I changed';
arr1.someOtherMember.value = 'I changed';

The assignment to someMember is a straightforward assignment, setting a property of an instance.

The second case
The second assignment is reassigning a property of an object, that is referenced by Array.prototype.someOtherMember. The Reference to the object literal doesn't change, only the object itself. Just as in any other language: when dealing with references, the object can change as much as it likes, the reference will remain the same (its value might change, but its memory address doesn't).
When you redefine the changeMember method to reassign a new Object literal to a property, you're in essence creating the same situation as in case one: straightforward assignment of a new object to a property, that causes JS not to scan the prototype, but merely assign the property on an instance-level. You could use Object.getPrototypeOf(this) or (for older browsers) this.prototype:

Array.prototype.changeMember = function (val)
{
    this.someMember = 'I changed At instance level';
    Object.getPrototypeOf(this).someMember = 'Reassing prototype property to '+ val;
    Object.getPrototypeOf(this).someOtherMember = {value:val};//changes proto only
};

Having said that, if you want something like a static property, you're better of using Object.defineProperty:

Object.defineProperty(Array.prototype,'sortofStatic',{value:'I cannot be changed',writable:false,configurable:false});

More examples of this can be found on MDN

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So what is the difference between Object.defineProperty and Array.prototype.someOtherMember = { value: "My value is static" }; –  Konstantin D - Infragistics Oct 13 '12 at 6:20
    
@KonstantinD-Infragistics: using Object.defineProperty, you're not assigning an object literal, you're defining a property as read-only/rw, (non-)enumerable, ... just read the docs –  Elias Van Ootegem Oct 13 '12 at 10:32

In someOtherMember one instance of Object is shared between all instances of Array.

In the first case you are changing the value of that object, so the value changes for all instances of Array.

In the second case you are changing an object itself. So the instance of an Array will contain another object that the others.

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Not entirely correct: no array has the someMember property, JS gets that value directly from the prototype. When the changeMember function is called on an array instance, though, that instance is augmented and gets its own someMember property, the other array instances still have no extra properties. The value of someMember isn't an object either, it's a constant –  Elias Van Ootegem Oct 12 '12 at 9:16

The first case is well understood.

The second case (where someOtherMember isn't static member), you are overwritting the someOtherMember every time you call changeMember (deleting the static member value) therefore ceases to exist the static member.

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Array.prototype.someMember = "My value is not static";

// Here `someOtherMember` is simply a property which points to a memory location
// So initially it will point to the same memory location for all instances of `Array`
Array.prototype.someOtherMember = {
    value: "My value is static"
};

Array.prototype.changeMember = function (newValue) {

    this.someMember = newValue;

    // Here we change a value stored in the memory location pointed by `someOtherMember`
    // As all instances point to the same memory location this change will reflect in all instances
    this.someOtherMember.value = newValue;
};


Array.prototype.changeMember = function (newValue) {

    this.someMember = newValue;

    // Here for this particular instance we make `someOtherMember` point to a new memory location.
    // All instances will point to the old memory location until `changeMember` is invoked.
    this.someOtherMember = { value: newValue };
};
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