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The question I have is quite simple, but I couldn't find a solution so far:

How can I convert a UTF8 encoded string to a latin1 encoded string in C++ without using any extra libs like libiconv?

Every example I could find so far is for latin1 to UTF8 conversion?

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2  
UTF8 can represent 65536 code points; latin1 (ISO-8859-1) can only represent 256. How do you want to deal with all the characters which can't be converted? –  simonc Oct 12 '12 at 9:11
    
You can translate to C this jamesmurty.com/2011/12/30/python-code-utf8-to-latin1 (note that not all symbols can be converted) –  Alter Mann Oct 12 '12 at 9:17
1  
@DavidRF condition "without using any extra libs" means not using ready made functions like in the last line of given code, utf8_text.encode('ISO-8859-1', 'replace') –  Dialecticus Oct 12 '12 at 9:25
    
@Dialecticus yes, but translate is not copy paste :) you can ommit this line in order to get only the chars to convert –  Alter Mann Oct 12 '12 at 9:33
    
I will have a look at this –  ashiaka Oct 12 '12 at 9:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
typedef unsigned value_type;

template <typename Iterator>
size_t get_length (Iterator p)
{
    unsigned char c = static_cast<unsigned char> (*p);
    if (c < 0x80) return 1;
    else if (!(c & 0x20)) return 2;
    else if (!(c & 0x10)) return 3;
    else if (!(c & 0x08)) return 4;
    else if (!(c & 0x04)) return 5;
    else return 6;
}

template <typename Iterator>
value_type get_value (Iterator p)
{
    size_t len = get_length (p);

    if (len == 1)
    return *p;

    value_type res = static_cast<unsigned char> (
                                    *p & (0xff >> (len + 1)))
                                     << ((len - 1) * 6);

    for (--len; len; --len)
        res |= (static_cast<unsigned char> (*(++p)) - 0x80) << ((len - 1) * 6);

    return res;
}

This function will return the unicode code point at p. You can now convert a string using

for (std::string::iterator p = s_utf8.begin(); p != s_utf8.end(); ++p)
{
     value_type value = get_value<std::string::iterator&>(p));
     if (value > 0xff)
         throw "AAAAAH!";
     s_latin1.append(static_cast<char>(value));
}

No guarantees, the code is quite old :)

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And yes, I know that UTF-8 does officially only support maximum 4 bytes length, this can be implemented more pedantic. –  filmor Oct 12 '12 at 9:21
    
Does this convert german umlauts (ö,ä,ü,ß) correctly as well? –  ashiaka Oct 12 '12 at 9:35
    
@ashiaka: I doubt it ... I don't think those characters are available in latin1 ... –  Goz Oct 12 '12 at 9:50
    
@Goz: They are: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms537495(v=vs.85).aspx –  ashiaka Oct 12 '12 at 9:56
    
What do you think latin1 is supposed to encode? Look here for example: decodeunicode.org/de/u+00dc. Everything with a code point below 0xff will be properly converted, everything above that will result in an exception. Indeed it is also converted, but it can't be encoded in 8 bits. –  filmor Oct 12 '12 at 9:56

Here is a version of filmor's answer that I wrote for my purposes. A bit more readable, probably a bit slower. I didn't need the template stuff since I was always dealing with char *, and in my case I wanted to replace non-Latin1 character's with _. Just in case it helps someone:

int GetUtf8CharacterLength( unsigned char utf8Char )
{
    if ( utf8Char < 0x80 ) return 1;
    else if ( ( utf8Char & 0x20 ) == 0 ) return 2;
    else if ( ( utf8Char & 0x10 ) == 0 ) return 3;
    else if ( ( utf8Char & 0x08 ) == 0 ) return 4;
    else if ( ( utf8Char & 0x04 ) == 0 ) return 5;

    return 6;
}

char Utf8ToLatin1Character( char *s, int *readIndex )
{
    int len = GetUtf8CharacterLength( static_cast<unsigned char>( s[ *readIndex ] ) );
    if ( len == 1 )
    {
        char c = s[ *readIndex ];
        (*readIndex)++;

        return c;
    }

    unsigned int v = ( s[ *readIndex ] & ( 0xff >> ( len + 1 ) ) ) << ( ( len - 1 ) * 6 );
    (*readIndex)++;
    for ( len-- ; len > 0 ; len-- )
    {
        v |= ( static_cast<unsigned char>( s[ *readIndex ] ) - 0x80 ) << ( ( len - 1 ) * 6 );
        (*readIndex)++;
    }

    return ( v > 0xff ) ? 0 : (char)v;
}

// overwrites s in place
char *Utf8ToLatin1String( char *s )
{
    for ( int readIndex = 0, writeIndex = 0 ; ; writeIndex++ )
    {
        if ( s[ readIndex ] == 0 )
        {
            s[ writeIndex ] = 0;
            break;
        }

        char c = Utf8ToLatin1Character( s, &readIndex );
        if ( c == 0 )
        {
            c = '_';
        }

        s[ writeIndex ] = c;
    }

    return s;
}

Test code:

char s2[ 256 ] = "lif\xc3\xa9 is b\xc3\xa9tt\xc3\xa9r with acc\xc3\xa9nts";
Utf8ToLatin1String( s2 );
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latin1 (aka ISO-8859-1) defines the first 256 code points of Unicode. Thus, in UTF-8, if your character is 8 bits, then it will exactly map to the latin1 equivalent. If it's more than 8 bits in length, then there is no correspondent within latin1 and you should map it to some "unknown character" (e.g., \0 or ?).

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1  
This is not true. It only works like this for 7 bits. –  filmor Oct 12 '12 at 9:11
    
Really? Damn... In which case, I guess the OP can use this and then manually map the remaining 128 points. –  Xophmeister Oct 12 '12 at 9:16
    
Conversion from UTF-16 to latin1 is simply removing every even zero, but conversion from UTF-8 to latin1 is a bit complicated. –  Dialecticus Oct 12 '12 at 9:17
1  
@Dialectius: But you have have multibyte encoding in UTF-16 ... –  Goz Oct 12 '12 at 9:50

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