Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am having a problem with a simulation program that calls a DLL to perform an optimization task. After having studied this issue for a certain time, I think my problem lies in the destructor I use to free memory after the DLL has returned the desired information. The simulation program was developed on Borland C++ Builder v6 and the DLL was developed on MS Visual C++ 2005.

For the simulation program (P) and the DLL to exchange data, I created two structures InputCPLEX and OutputCPLEX and a function optimize that takes two arguments: one object of type InputCPLEX and one object of type OutputCPLEX. Both structures are declared in a header file structures.h which belongs to the P project and the DLL project.

Both InputCPLEX and OutputCPLEX structures have int and int* members, so basically the file structures.h looks like :

//structures.h
struct InputCPLEX{
  public:
  int i;
  int* inputData;
}
struct OutputCPLEX{
  public:
  int j;
  int* outputData;
}

The idea is that along the simulation process (the execution of P), I periodically call the DLL to solve an optimization problem, so inputData is the array corresponding to the variables in my optimization problem and outputData is the array of optimal values for my variables. I know that it would have been easier to use the STL containers, such as vector<int>, however - correct me if I am wrong - it seems it is difficult to exchange STL objects between two different compilers.

Here is how things look in my main file (in P):

//main.h
InputCPLEX* input;
OutputCPLEX* output;
int* var;
int* sol;

//main.cpp    
[...] //lots of code
input = new InputCPLEX;
output = new OutputCPLEX;
int n = X; //where X is an integer 
var = new int[n]; 
[...] //some code to fill var
input->i = n; 
input->inputData = var; 
optimize(input,output); //calls the DLL
int m = output->j; 
sol = new int[n];
sol = output->outputData;
[...] //some code to use the optimized data
delete[] var;
delete[] sol;
delete input;
delete output;
[...] //lots of code

For more than one year I have been using this code without any constructor or destructor in the file structures.h, so no initialization of the structures members was performed. As you may have guessed, I am no expert in C++, in fact it's quite the opposite. I also want to underline that I did not code most of the simulation program, just some functions, this program was developed for more than 10 years by several developers, and the result is quite messy.

However, everything was working just fine until recently. I decided to provide more information to the DLL (for optimization purposes), and consequently the simulation program has been crashing systematically when running large simulations (involving large data sets). The extra information are pointers in both structures, my guess is that the program was leaking memory, so I tried to code a constructor and a destructor so that the memory allocated to the structures input and output could be properly managed. I tried the following code which I found searching up the internet :

//structures.h
struct InputCPLEX{
  public:
  int i;
  int* inputData;
  int* inputData2; // extra info
  int* inputData3; // extra info
  InputCPLEX(): i(0), inputData(0), inputData2(0), inputData3(0) {}
  ~InputCPLEX(){ 
    if (inputData) delete inputData;
    if (inputData2) delete inputData2;
    if (inputData3) delete inputData3;
  }
}
struct OutputCPLEX{
  public:
  int j;
  int* outputData;
  int* outputData2;
  int* outputData3;
  OutputCPLEX(): j(0), outputData(0), outputData2(0), outputData3(0) {}
  ~OutputCPLEX(){ 
    if (outputData) delete outputData;
    if (outputData2) delete outputData2;
    if (outputData3) delete outputData3;
  }
}

But it does not seems to work: the program crashes even faster, after only a short amount of time. Can someone help me identify the issues in my code? I know that there may be other factors affecting the execution of my program, but if I remove both constructors and destructors in structures.h file, then the simulation program is still able to execute small simulations, involving small data sets.

Thank you very much for your assistance, David.

share|improve this question
    
delete on a null pointer as no effect. The ifs in the destructor are unnecessary. And you should follow the rule of three. – R. Martinho Fernandes Oct 12 '12 at 9:41
    
Hello, what do you mean by >delete on a null pointer has no effect Do you mean that when I delete the objects input and output it automatically deletes their members, so I don't need to state that in the destructor ? – David Oct 12 '12 at 9:56
    
It means that you don't have to check whether a pointer is NULL or not before deleting it. – juanchopanza Oct 12 '12 at 10:04
    
Ok I understand, I'll remove the ifs. Thanks – David Oct 12 '12 at 10:08

You have to use consistent way of new - delete. If something was acquired by new[] you should delete it by delete[], if by new -> delete by delete. In your code you create input and output by new but delete via delete[].

BTW, you do not have to check a pointer for zero before deletion. delete handles zero pointers with no problems.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your prompt reply, there was a mistake in the code I posted : I did use delete and not delete[] to delete the objects input and output. I corrected my original post. – David Oct 12 '12 at 9:52

I see several problems in your code:

1) Memory leak/double deletion:

sol = new int[n];
sol = output->outputData; 

Here you override sol pointer right after initialization and data allocated by new int[n] is leaked. Also you double delete pointer in sol - second time in destructor of output. The same problem with var - you delete it twice, by explicit delete[] and in destructor of input.

Double deletion problem is raised after you have added destructors with delete, looks like before it was not a problem.

Also as @Riga mentioned you use new[] to allocate array, but delete instead of delete[] in destructors. This is not correct and this is Undefined Behavior. Despite this doesn't look like crash cause. In real world most compilers don't make difference implementing delete and delete[] for built-in and POD types. Serious problems can arise only when you delete array of objects with non-trivial destructors.

2) Where output->outputData is allocated? If in DLL it is another problem, as you usually cannot safely deallocate memory in your main program if it was allocated in DLL implemented with another compiler. The reason is different new/delete implementation and different heaps used by runtimes of main program and DLL.

You always shall allocate/deallocate memory on same side. Or use some common lower-level API - e.g. VirtualAlloc()/VirtualFree() or HeapAlloc()/HeapFree() with same heap handle.

share|improve this answer
    
About your fisrt point: I will remove the first data allocation sol = new int[n];. However, I am not sure I understand the double deletion: var and sol pointers are not members of the structures InputCPLEX or OutputCPLEX. Therefore, they are not deleted twice but only once by explicit delete[]. I dont see why the destructor of input would delete var. As far as what @Riga and you suggest, I have corrected the deletion of input and output but should I remove the delete instructions in the destructors? (From what you tell me I think I should). – David Oct 12 '12 at 12:19
    
About your second point, your guess is right: output->outputData is allocated in the DLL. But I can allocate it before using the optimize function by filling outputData with dummy values, should I do that? – David Oct 12 '12 at 12:20
    
@David Yes, they aren't members of the structures, but they hold the same pointer value as you assigned. Assignment of pointers copies the value of pointer (the address it points to), not the structure it points to. You could have a lot of pointers pointing to same structure in memory, but only one can be used to delete it. This is named ownership. – Rost Oct 12 '12 at 12:44
    
@David about second point - you should allocate and delete the memory you passed to DLL in main program, that's correct. What do you mean by dummy values, zeros to fill allocated array pointed by outputData? – Rost Oct 12 '12 at 12:48
    
Yes exactly. Thank you for the insight on pointers. If I understand correctly I could remove the destructors (or leave them empty) and just delete explicitly the pointers sol and var? – David Oct 12 '12 at 13:03

This looks odd:

int m = output->j; 
sol = new int[n];
sol = output->outputData;

as far as I understood it you return the size in m but allocate with n then you overwrite the array by setting the pointer (sol) to outputData I think you meant something like:

int m = output->j; 
sol = new int[m];
memcpy(sol,output->outputData,sizeof(int)*m);
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry for the confusion, the m integer was just for the sake of the example. I mean sol = new int[n];, i.e. I want to allocate the an array of size n. – David Oct 12 '12 at 12:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.