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I have a new application written in WPF that needs to support an old API that allows it to receive a message that has been posted to a hidden window. Typically another application uses FindWindow to identify the hidden window using the name of its custom window class.

1) I assume to implement a custom window class I need to use old school win32 calls?

My old c++ application used RegisterClass and CreateWindow to make the simplest possible invisible window.

I believe I should be able to do the same all within c#. I don't want my project to have to compile any unmanaged code.

I have tried inheriting from System.Windows.Interop.HwndHost and using System.Runtime.InteropServices.DllImport to pull in the above API methods.

Doing this I can successfully host a standard win32 window e.g. "listbox" inside WPF. However when I call CreateWindowEx for my custom window it always returns null.

My call to RegisterClass succeeds but I am not sure what I should be setting the WNDCLASS.lpfnWndProc member to.

2) Does anyone know how to do this successfully?

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4 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted

For the record I finally got this to work. Turned out the difficulties I had were down to string marshalling problems. I had to be more precise in my importing of win32 functions.

Below is the code that will create a custom window class in c# - useful for supporting old APIs you might have that rely on custom window classes.

It should work in either WPF or Winforms as long as a message pump is running on the thread.

EDIT: Updated to fix the reported crash due to early collection of the delegate that wraps the callback. The delegate is now held as a member and the delegate explicitly marshaled as a function pointer. This fixes the issue and makes it easier to understand the behaviour.

class CustomWindow : IDisposable
{
    delegate IntPtr WndProc(IntPtr hWnd, uint msg, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam);

    [System.Runtime.InteropServices.StructLayout(
        System.Runtime.InteropServices.LayoutKind.Sequential,
       CharSet = System.Runtime.InteropServices.CharSet.Unicode
    )]
    struct WNDCLASS
    {
        public uint style;
        public IntPtr lpfnWndProc;
        public int cbClsExtra;
        public int cbWndExtra;
        public IntPtr hInstance;
        public IntPtr hIcon;
        public IntPtr hCursor;
        public IntPtr hbrBackground;
        [System.Runtime.InteropServices.MarshalAs(System.Runtime.InteropServices.UnmanagedType.LPWStr)]
        public string lpszMenuName;
        [System.Runtime.InteropServices.MarshalAs(System.Runtime.InteropServices.UnmanagedType.LPWStr)]
        public string lpszClassName;
    }

    [System.Runtime.InteropServices.DllImport("user32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
    static extern System.UInt16 RegisterClassW(
        [System.Runtime.InteropServices.In] ref WNDCLASS lpWndClass
    );

    [System.Runtime.InteropServices.DllImport("user32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
    static extern IntPtr CreateWindowExW(
       UInt32 dwExStyle,
       [System.Runtime.InteropServices.MarshalAs(System.Runtime.InteropServices.UnmanagedType.LPWStr)]
       string lpClassName,
       [System.Runtime.InteropServices.MarshalAs(System.Runtime.InteropServices.UnmanagedType.LPWStr)]
       string lpWindowName,
       UInt32 dwStyle,
       Int32 x,
       Int32 y,
       Int32 nWidth,
       Int32 nHeight,
       IntPtr hWndParent,
       IntPtr hMenu,
       IntPtr hInstance,
       IntPtr lpParam
    );

    [System.Runtime.InteropServices.DllImport("user32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
    static extern System.IntPtr DefWindowProcW(
        IntPtr hWnd, uint msg, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam
    );

    [System.Runtime.InteropServices.DllImport("user32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
    static extern bool DestroyWindow(
        IntPtr hWnd
    );

    private const int ERROR_CLASS_ALREADY_EXISTS = 1410;

    private bool m_disposed;
    private IntPtr m_hwnd;

    public void Dispose() 
    {
        Dispose(true);
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }

    private void Dispose(bool disposing) 
    {
        if (!m_disposed) {
            if (disposing) {
                // Dispose managed resources
            }

            // Dispose unmanaged resources
            if (m_hwnd != IntPtr.Zero) {
                DestroyWindow(m_hwnd);
                m_hwnd = IntPtr.Zero;
            }

        }
    }

    public CustomWindow(string class_name){

        if (class_name == null) throw new System.Exception("class_name is null");
        if (class_name == String.Empty) throw new System.Exception("class_name is empty");

        m_wnd_proc_delegate = CustomWndProc;

        // Create WNDCLASS
        WNDCLASS wind_class = new WNDCLASS();
        wind_class.lpszClassName = class_name;
        wind_class.lpfnWndProc = System.Runtime.InteropServices.Marshal.GetFunctionPointerForDelegate(m_wnd_proc_delegate);

        UInt16 class_atom = RegisterClassW(ref wind_class);

        int last_error = System.Runtime.InteropServices.Marshal.GetLastWin32Error();

        if (class_atom == 0 && last_error != ERROR_CLASS_ALREADY_EXISTS) {
            throw new System.Exception("Could not register window class");
        }

        // Create window
        m_hwnd = CreateWindowExW(
            0,
            class_name,
            String.Empty,
            0,
            0,
            0,
            0,
            0,
            IntPtr.Zero,
            IntPtr.Zero,
            IntPtr.Zero,
            IntPtr.Zero
        );
    }

    private static IntPtr CustomWndProc(IntPtr hWnd, uint msg, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam) 
    {
        return DefWindowProcW(hWnd, msg, wParam, lParam);
    }

    private WndProc m_wnd_proc_delegate;
}
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+1 for sharing the code. Thanks! –  Antoine Aubry Apr 29 '10 at 18:55
1  
This works fine on 32bit windows, but crashes on 64bit. I'm having trouble debugging why, because the piece of code that crashes is nothing to do with the custom window. (It happens when I set Visible = false in an event handler of another form that has nothing to do with this class, but when I don't instantiate it, it doesn't crash.) Do you by any chance have any idea why it might be, or any direction towards which you can point me? –  crdx Apr 11 '11 at 23:02
    
Should now be fixed. –  morechilli Aug 9 '13 at 18:22
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WNDCLASS wind_class; put the definition in the class, not the function, and the crash will be fixed.

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Thanks - I've hopefully fixed the example with a similar change - I manage the delegate lifetime rather than the WNDCLASS. –  morechilli Aug 9 '13 at 18:23
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1) You can just subclass a normal Windows Forms class... no need for all those win32 calls, you just need to parse the WndProc message manually... is all.

2) You can import the System.Windows.Forms namespace and use it alongside WPF, I believe there won't be any problems as long as you don't intertwine too much windows forms into your WPF application. You just want to instantiate your custom hidden form to receieve a message is that right?

example of WndProc subclassing:

protected override void WndProc(ref System.Windows.Forms.Message m)
{
   // *always* let the base class process the message
   base.WndProc(ref m);

   const int WM_NCHITTEST = 0x84;
   const int HTCAPTION = 2;
   const int HTCLIENT = 1;

   // if Windows is querying where the mouse is and the base form class said
   // it's on the client area, let's cheat and say it's on the title bar instead
   if ( m.Msg == WM_NCHITTEST && m.Result.ToInt32() == HTCLIENT )
      m.Result = new IntPtr(HTCAPTION);
}

Since you already know RegisterClass and all those Win32 calls, I assume the WndProc message wouldn't be a problem for you...

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Thanks for the suggestion but I'm not sure it solves my problem. I need the window class to have a specific name to match the old API. I didn't think you could set the class name in winforms? –  morechilli Sep 24 '08 at 20:55
    
@morechill you can set the class name for your forms when using winforms. –  chakrit Jul 9 '13 at 4:49
    
Thanks for the update. I'm no longer doing .net development but would be happy to update my responses if you can provide a reliable working example. –  morechilli Jul 10 '13 at 10:22
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I'd like to comment the answer of morechilli:

public CustomWindow(string class_name){

    if (class_name == null) throw new System.Exception("class_name is null");
    if (class_name == String.Empty) throw new System.Exception("class_name is empty");

    // Create WNDCLASS
    WNDCLASS wind_class = new WNDCLASS();
    wind_class.lpszClassName = class_name;
    wind_class.lpfnWndProc = CustomWndProc;

    UInt16 class_atom = RegisterClassW(ref wind_class);

    int last_error = System.Runtime.InteropServices.Marshal.GetLastWin32Error();

    if (class_atom == 0 && last_error != ERROR_CLASS_ALREADY_EXISTS) {
        throw new System.Exception("Could not register window class");
    }

    // Create window
    m_hwnd = CreateWindowExW(
        0,
        class_name,
        String.Empty,
        0,
        0,
        0,
        0,
        0,
        IntPtr.Zero,
        IntPtr.Zero,
        IntPtr.Zero,
        IntPtr.Zero
    );
}

In the constructor I copied above is slight error: The WNDCLASS instance is created, but not saved. It will eventually be garbage collected. But the WNDCLASS holds the WndProc delegate. This results in an error as soon as WNDCLASS is garbage collected. The instance of WNDCLASS should be hold in a member variable until the window is destroyed.

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Thanks - I've hopefully fixed the example with a similar change - I manage the delegate lifetime rather than the WNDCLASS. –  morechilli Aug 9 '13 at 18:24
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