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I have looked for answers on this subject and I have posted in another forum but this seems to be the font of all knowledge. I am trying to pull data from a SQL Server 2000 database using PowerShell. The Powershell script calls a stored procedure, this then extracts the data and export-csv outs it to, well a CSV. The problem is that the datetime fields in the outputted data have lost their milliseconds. This happens when PowerShell extracts the data from the database into a temporary table. Here are the two bits of code.

PowerShell script

#VARIABLES
$SqlQuery = "SAP_proc"
#Connection Strings
$Server = "server"
$Database = "db_dab"
#Output Files
$OutputPath = "c:\Sapout.csv"
#END OF VARIABLES

#SQL Connection
$SqlConnection = New-Object System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection
$SqlConnection.ConnectionString = "Server=$Server;Database=$Database;Integrated Security=True"
$SqlCmd = New-Object System.Data.SqlClient.SqlCommand
$SqlCmd.CommandText = "SAP_proc"
$SqlCmd.Connection = $SqlConnection
$SqlAdapter = New-Object System.Data.SqlClient.SqlDataAdapter
$SqlAdapter.SelectCommand = $SqlCmd
$DataSet = New-Object System.Data.DataSet
$DataOut = $SqlAdapter.Fill($DataSet)
#$DataOut = $SqlAdapter.FillSchema($DataSet,[System.Data.SchemaType]::Source)
#Data Manipulation
$DataOut | Out-Null
#Export Data to Hash Table
$DataTable = $DataSet.Tables[0] 
#Export Has table to CSV
$DataTable | Export-CSV -Delimiter "," -Encoding Unicode -Path $OutputPath -NoTypeInformation
$SqlConnection.Close()

Stored procedure

ALTER proc [dbo].[SAP_proc]
as
DECLARE @return_value int
DECLARE @starttime datetime
DECLARE @endtime datetime

SET @starttime = DATEADD (dd, -30, CURRENT_TIMESTAMP)
SET @endtime = CURRENT_TIMESTAMP

EXEC    @return_value = [dbo].[sp_agent]
        @starttime
        ,@endtime 

SELECT  'Return Value' = @return_value

Because the other stored procedure SP_agent is created by the software I can't edit it. Also I don't want to replicate the software defined stored procedure (with SELECT convert to varchar for datetime) in my command text string as it is a behemoth stored procedure.

Any help would be massively useful.

share|improve this question
    
No unfortunately not. When i run the stored procedure SAP_proc (which i created to be able to use dateadd and current_timestamp) it returns the DateTime with milliseconds, the problem comes when extracting to the DataSet in PowerShell, when I step through the script and I simply display DataTable as opposed to export it to a CSV there is no millisecond data. If I run the SP through SQL manager and export the result grid to CSV i have millisecond data. Yes i know SP_agent is badly named. I didn't create it the software on the server did. –  wbbigdave Oct 12 '12 at 11:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It's not a Powershell issue or a temp table issue. This is because your datetime column is converted to a string when you call export-csv using the default tostring method which doesn't include milliseconds. If you want milliseconds then specify it in the tostring method call:

$a = get-date
$a.ToString("d/M/yyyy hh:mm:ss.fff tt")

#To to something similar with your export-csv of a datatable you can create an expression:

$DataTable | select column1, column2, @{n=datecolumn;e={$_.datecolumn.ToString("d/M/yyyy hh:mm:ss.fff tt")}} | export-csv <rest of code>

Edited 10/17/2012 It seems like you are having trouble with this still. So here's a complete script which I've tested outputs milliseconds. You'll need to change the variable section to your environment. I hope this helps:

#VARIABLES
$SqlQuery = "select 'test' as column1, 'milliseconds' as column2, getdate() as datecolumn"
#Connection Strings
$Server = "$env:computername\sql1"
$Database = "tempdb"
#Output Files
$OutputPath = "./millisec.csv"
#END OF VARIABLES

#SQL Connection
$SqlConnection = New-Object System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection
$SqlConnection.ConnectionString = "Server=$Server;Database=$Database;Integrated Security=True"
$SqlCmd = New-Object System.Data.SqlClient.SqlCommand
$SqlCmd.CommandText = $SqlQuery
$SqlCmd.Connection = $SqlConnection
$SqlAdapter = New-Object System.Data.SqlClient.SqlDataAdapter
$SqlAdapter.SelectCommand = $SqlCmd
$DataSet = New-Object System.Data.DataSet
$DataOut = $SqlAdapter.Fill($DataSet)
#$DataOut = $SqlAdapter.FillSchema($DataSet,[System.Data.SchemaType]::Source)
#Data Manipulation
$DataOut | Out-Null
#Export Data to Hash Table
$DataTable = $DataSet.Tables[0] 
#Export Has table to CSV
#$DataTable | Export-CSV -Delimiter "," -Encoding Unicode -Path $OutputPath -NoTypeInformation
$DataTable | select column1, column2, @{n='datecolumn';e={$_.datecolumn.ToString("M/d/yyyy hh:mm:ss.fff tt")}} | export-csv $OutputPath -NoTypeInformation -force

$SqlConnection.Close()

#Another code example with explanation. Added on 10/23/2012

#VARIABLES
$SqlQuery = "select getdate() as datecolumn"
#Connection Strings
$Server = "$env:computername\sql1"
$Database = "tempdb"


$SqlConnection = New-Object System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection
$SqlConnection.ConnectionString = "Server=$Server;Database=$Database;Integrated Security=True"
$SqlConnection.Open() 
$SqlCmd = new-Object System.Data.SqlClient.SqlCommand($SqlQuery, $SqlConnection) 
$data = $SqlCmd.ExecuteScalar() 
$SqlConnection.Close()

#Notice NO millisecond
Write-Output $data

#See $data is an object of type System.DateTime
$data | gm

#There's a property called millisecond
#Millisecond          Property       int Millisecond {get;} 

#Although you don't "see" millisecond's on screen it's still there
$data.Millisecond


#Powershell uses a types and format rules to define how data is display on screen. You can see this by  looking at 
#C:\Windows\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\types.ps1xml and searching for "DataTime". This file along with format file define how data is displayed
#When you display datatime screen it's implicitly calling
#Searching for datetime in types.ps1xml you'll find this line:
#"{0} {1}" -f $this.ToLongDateString(), $this.ToLongTimeString()

#for our example

"{0} {1}" -f $data.ToLongDateString(), $data.ToLongTimeString()

#So millisecond is still there, but if you want millisecond in your output to CSV, screen or file you'll need to call a ToString method with a date format. Here's an example:
$data.ToString("M/d/yyyy hh:mm:ss.fff tt")
share|improve this answer
    
Ok I am trying this now but I am unsure of the syntax on the @{n=datecoumn; section, what is the datecolumn. I keep getting errors thrown out. –  wbbigdave Oct 17 '12 at 12:19
    
Ok an quick update, It is not when I export to CSV that this problem arrises. It's after I fill the $DataTable with the $DataSet.Table[0] command. If i call the $DataTable after that then I loose the millisecond data. –  wbbigdave Oct 17 '12 at 12:50
    
The problem I have is I can't use a select query as it is all based on calling a stored procedure. I can't use the stored procedure I call within my smaller stored procedure as it is too long (about three pages). Not sure what to do now. The millisecond data seems to be dropped when I fill the DataSet as I have displayed the dataset after it was filled. –  wbbigdave Oct 23 '12 at 11:15
    
You don't have to use a select statement. I could have easily called a stored procedure. The last line of my Powershell script is the Powershell cmdlet select-object aliased to select. –  Chad Miller Oct 23 '12 at 11:55
    
Thank you for you continuing help. I am faced with the problem however, that when the data is Filled into the Data Set it looses the millisecond data. I am sorry if I am missing something I am truly a beginner at a lot of this. –  wbbigdave Oct 23 '12 at 12:12

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