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I am using Ubuntu 12.04 32 bit edition I wrote a program to receive an XML file from a TCP client. The same program is receiving data from another process by a unix domain socket also. For that I am using the poll() system call.

My problem is, some times I am not getting the XML data correctly or some time it was missing too. But since I am using TCP, if there is a data loss client will know. but client is not showing any error. Could anybody please tell me why this is happening??

I can provide some code:

int config_server_tcp(int port)
{   
    int sockfd = -1;
    struct sockaddr_in my_addr;                     // my address information
    if ((sockfd = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0)) == -1) 
    {
        perror("socket() failed.");
    }
    else
    {
        my_addr.sin_family = AF_INET;
        my_addr.sin_port = htons(port);
        my_addr.sin_addr.s_addr = htonl(INADDR_ANY);    // automatically fill with my IP
        memset(&(my_addr.sin_zero), 0, 8);              // zero the rest of the struct
        if (bind(sockfd, (struct sockaddr *)&my_addr, sizeof(struct sockaddr)) == -1) 
        {
            perror("bind() failed.");
        }
        else
        {
            if (listen (sockfd, 8) == -1)
            {
                perror("listen() failed.");
            }
        }
    }
    return sockfd;
}

int send_to_tcp_server(unsigned char * message, int size, char * server_ip, int port) 
{
    int sockfd;
    struct sockaddr_in their_addr;
    int numbytes = -1;
    if ((sockfd = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0)) == -1)
    {
        perror("socket() failed.");
    }
    else
    {
        their_addr.sin_family = AF_INET;
        their_addr.sin_port = htons(port);
        their_addr.sin_addr.s_addr=inet_addr(server_ip);
        memset(&(their_addr.sin_zero), '\0', 8);                // zero the rest of the struct
        if (connect(sockfd, (struct sockaddr *)&their_addr, sizeof (their_addr)) == -1)
        {
            perror("connect() failed.");
        }
        else
        {
            if ((numbytes=send(sockfd , message, size, 0)) == -1) 
            {
                printf ("Sending failed.\n");
            }
        }
        close (sockfd);
    }
    return numbytes;
}


void process_tcp (int sock)
{
    struct sockaddr_in their_addr;                  // talker's address information
    int received;
    socklen_t addr_len;
    char buffer[BUFF_SIZE];

    addr_len = sizeof (their_addr);
    int clientfd = accept (sock, (struct sockaddr *)&their_addr, &addr_len);
    if (clientfd == -1)
    {
        perror("accept() failed.");
    }       
    else
    {
        do
        {
            received = recv(clientfd, buffer, BUFF_SIZE, 0);
            if (received == -1) 
            {
                perror("recv() failed.");
                break;
            }
            else
            {
                //do something
            }
        }
        while (received != 0);
        close (clientfd);
    }
}

The process TCP function is called in a loop

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by CodeCaster, Basile Starynkevitch, Karoly Horvath, Lucifer, BNL Oct 12 '12 at 14:07

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
could you provide some code? –  gureedo Oct 12 '12 at 11:21
5  
Please show your code, most likely you're treating TCP as a datagram protocol (which is wrong), but we can't really say without code. –  KillianDS Oct 12 '12 at 11:22
    
Most likely you forgot to design a protocol for carrying XML over TCP and just wrote code without thinking about issues such as application-level message boundaries. –  David Schwartz Oct 12 '12 at 11:25
1  
The bug is almost certainly in the code you replaced with //do something. –  David Schwartz Oct 12 '12 at 11:35
1  
@Hari: It probably is. That's the most critical code there. That's where you have to actually implement your "XML over TCP" protocol. The bug is most likely in your "XML over TCP" protocol design or implementation. –  David Schwartz Oct 12 '12 at 11:40
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The bug is almost certainly in the bit of code you didn't show, the code that assembles an application-level message according to your XML-over-TCP protocol. Here's one way to do it:

void process_tcp (int sock)
{
    struct sockaddr_in their_addr;
    int received, total_received;
    socklen_t addr_len;
    char buffer[BUFF_SIZE];

    addr_len = sizeof (their_addr);
    int clientfd = accept (sock, (struct sockaddr *)&their_addr, &addr_len);
    if (clientfd == -1)
    {
        perror("accept() failed.");
    }       
    else
    {
        total_received = 0;
        do
        {
            received = recv(clientfd, buffer + total_received,
                            BUFF_SIZE - total_received, 0);
            if (received == -1) 
            {
                perror("recv() failed.");
                break;
            }
            if (received > 0)
                total_received += received;
        }
        while (received != 0);
        buffer[total_received] = 0;
        // here we can do something with 'buffer'              
        close (clientfd);
    }
}

Note that a lot of error checking is missing.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you David. I will try this code. –  Harikrishnan Oct 12 '12 at 12:10
    
I am sorry, still it is not receiving the correct data. –  Harikrishnan Oct 12 '12 at 12:22
    
Can you describe what it is receiving and in what way that's incorrect? –  David Schwartz Oct 12 '12 at 12:25
    
OK. For the first two time I sent the XML with an interval of 10 seconds and it is receiving without any error. After that I sent it with approx 1 second interval and it receives some part of data followed by last portion of data and then some of the middle portion. As I said in the question I am receiving from a UNIX domail socket at the same time with the help of poll(). Does that causes anything? –  Harikrishnan Oct 12 '12 at 12:27
1  
Oh, I think I know what it is. Your sockets are non-blocking, right? If so, you need a per-socket application message buffer. Otherwise, you have no place to assemble the application message. My code above works fine for blocking sockets. But for non-blocking ones, you need to keep the application-level protocol state somewhere. –  David Schwartz Oct 12 '12 at 12:27
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