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I have to change an existing application. I need to have the application start with a splash screen that is displayed while all sorts of initializing is done. (this may take a while, therefore the splash screen)

However what I see is that a content provider's onCreate is called before the onCreate of the application is invoked. This content provider must rely on data that is loaded at initializing the application.

Can anyone tell me which steps are taken when an application starts up? Furthermore can anyone tell me how to overcome this catch-22 situation?

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I need to have the application start with a splash screen that is displayed while all sorts of initializing is done. (this may take a while, therefore the splash screen)

Splash screens are considered to be poor form. Allow the user to get into some of the application, even if you have to block off certain portions waiting for some data to load off the Internet.

Can anyone tell me which steps are taken when an application starts up?

Your Application object and all ContentProvider implementations are created before anything else happens (e.g., an activity is created). From the standpoint of developer-facing code, that's it -- the framework itself does more stuff, but nothing that triggers callbacks into our code.

Furthermore can anyone tell me how to overcome this catch-22 situation?

Get rid of the ContentProvider, as you probably do not need it.

Or, rewrite the ContentProvider to not need "data that is loaded" from its onCreate() method.

Or, rearchitect your application to use caching, syncing, etc., such that the app can start up without limitations at the outset. As a bonus, this one would allow you to get rid of the splash screen as well.

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Thanks for the quick response. Because it is an existing application (open source) on which we'll base a new one, we want to alter the code as little as possible, so that new versions of the base code do not require a large level of refactoring. – user1221261 Oct 12 '12 at 12:15

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