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If I understand Android manual, BroadcastReceiver is treated as stateless entity, so I should keep a service which will serve as data container (those are my conclusions).

As per each request for data access I should execute startService (?) -- I can pass this way data to service, but how to get data back?

I mean in recommended way? I could think of passing "out" data, and service on completion would change it, so when startService returns I could check the data I sent in order to retrieve the result.

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If I understand Android manual, BroadcastReceiver is treated as stateless entity, so I should keep a service which will serve as data container (those are my conclusions).

Having a service around solely to hold onto data will make your users dislike you, and is no guarantee that the data will stick around anyway. The user and the OS can and will get rid of your process whenever they wish.

Please use files (e.g., database, SharedPreferences) for holding data that needs to survive between process invocations.

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It have a service anyway, because it launched receiver in the first place. –  greenoldman Oct 12 '12 at 12:45
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@macias: If by "it launched receiver" you mean that the service calls registerRecevier(), then simply have the BroadcastReceiver be an inner class of the Service, in which case both objects have access to the Service's data members. This does not eliminate the need for a persistent data store, though, for any data that should live past the lifetime of the service, and services do not live forever. –  CommonsWare Oct 12 '12 at 12:49
    
Thank you. This is valuable, but I would like to keep things clean and have separate files (and also learn more). I will keep the data in preferences as you (and just8blaze) said, but I also need to communicate with service as well. –  greenoldman Oct 12 '12 at 13:02
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@macias: Then use a static data member or something as an in-memory cache of the persistent data. –  CommonsWare Oct 12 '12 at 13:06
    
To avoid long discussion in comments here is the question: stackoverflow.com/questions/12859774/… –  greenoldman Oct 12 '12 at 13:07

I wouldn't use a service for this, SharedPreferences are very useful for storing some key/value pair data.

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