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I want to expose some kernel memory to user space without any extra over head of system call. I chose the mmap route for doing this. Here's the sample code from driver.

int mmp_mmap(struct file *filp, struct vm_area_struct *vma)
{

    struct page *page = NULL;
    struct mmp * mpdev=NULL;
    unsigned long pfn;
    mpdev=filp->private_data;
    vma->vm_flags |= VM_RESERVED|VM_IO;
    /*
     * Get the page corresponding to the buffer address
     */
    page=virt_to_page(mpdev->buf);
    pfn=page_to_pfn(page);
    /*
     * Now create a entry corresponding to this pfn in the page table.
     */
    if (remap_pfn_range(vma,vma->vm_start,pfn,vma->vm_end-  
                        vma->vm_start,vma->vm_page_prot)) {
        printk(KERN_ERR "remap_pfn_range failed\n");
        return -EAGAIN;
    }
    return 0;
}

The problem is that when the user space program opens this device,mmaps the memory and modifys it then it works fine for the first time. Any subsequent open and mapping of the memory does not modify the kernel buffer. The user land programs explicitly does a unmap of this mmaped buffer.

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1 Answer

If you just want to expose some kernel memory to user space, you may use /dev/kmem instead of implementing your own one. You should enable this device when you configure the kernel:

device drivers --> Character devices -->/dev/kmem virtual device support.

If you insist to do this, you may read the code of /dev/kmem for a hint.

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