Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Update

I'm now wondering if the fact that the IEnumerable that the foreach loop iterates over here is from a loop that uses yield return. I'm not sure if this has any effect on threading... ?


Can anyone point out why I never see the BackgroundWorker RunWorkerCompleted event fire in this code (this is a .NET 4, MVC 3 application)?

Regardless of what I set for, WorkerSupportsCancellation and WorkerReportsProgress the completed events never seem to fire.

Even when I try throwing an exception in the DoWork block, I never see the completed event. As I understand it, I should.

Anything obvious here?

By the way, I'm unable to upgrade the project to .NET 4.5 to use newer async features due to project restrictions.

var autoResetEvent = new AutoResetEvent(false);

UploadsExpected = pagesFound;

foreach (var rasterisedPageFilePath in rasterisedPageFilePathList)
{
    // Track uploads

    UploadsStarted += 1;

    int uploadCount = UploadsStarted;

    // Track concurrent uploads in main thread and while we are at our 
    // maximum, pause and wait before starting the next upload thread

    while (ConcurrentUploadsRunning >= maxConcurrentUploads) 
    {
        Debug.WriteLine(string.Format("Waiting to start upload: {0}", 
            uploadCount));

        Thread.Sleep(3000);
    }

    ConcurrentUploadsRunning += 1; 

    Debug.WriteLine(string.Format("Initiating new upload: {0}", uploadCount));

    // Create a background worker so we can run the upload asynchronously.

    var backgroundWorker = new BackgroundWorker();

    // Set up anonymous method that runs asynchronously

    backgroundWorker.DoWork += (sender, e) => 
    {
        try
        {
            var storageManager = new storageManager(awsS3BucketName);

            string imgFilePath = (string) e.Argument;

            using (var fileStream = new FileStream(imgFilePath, FileMode.Open))
            {
                storageManager.Save(Path.GetFileName(imgFilePath), 
                    MimeTypes.JPEG, fileStream);
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            UploadHasFailed = true;

            m_logManager.Fatal("Upload of file to AWS S3 has failed", ex);
        }
        // Run check for AutoResetEvent following Save complete,
        // and if the completed uploads count indicates that all uploads
        // have finished, set AutoResetEvent so main thread can exit

        if ((UploadsCompleted += 1) == UploadsExpected)
        {
            autoResetEvent.Set();
        }

        Debug.WriteLine(string.Format("Upload complete: {0}", uploadCount));

        ConcurrentUploadsRunning -= 1;
    };

    backgroundWorker.RunWorkerCompleted += (sender, args) =>
    {
         // Never fires
    };

    backgroundWorker.ProgressChanged += (sender, args) =>
    {
        // Never fires
    };

    backgroundWorker.RunWorkerAsync(rasterisedPageFilePath);

}

autoResetEvent.WaitOne();

try
{
    inputStream.Close();

} catch { }
share|improve this question
1  
Are you open to using Task<T>? It would probably be much easier to support in this case and is available in .NET 4.0. –  casperOne Oct 12 '12 at 13:08
    
It could be because your filestream is blocked. Do you have access to the file? –  Silvermind Oct 12 '12 at 13:10
    
@Silvermind, yes any handles on the file have been closed. –  grx Oct 12 '12 at 13:14
    
@casperOne - Thanks! Replacing the BackgroundWorker with a Task has worked, and I can now use ContinueWith(ContinuationAction) to get the result of the task back in the main thread. If you add as answer I will mark it as such. Still don't know what was wrong with the code before though! –  grx Oct 12 '12 at 13:39

1 Answer 1

There are many strange quirks in this code - is the thread executing the code above your main thread or some other thread? Either way, if it's your GUI thread then it's blocking (.Sleep(3000)), if it isn't, then you create your backgroundworker in the wrong context

share|improve this answer
    
The sleep is to control the spawning of background threads, and this does not block the thread that the background worker runs in. –  grx Oct 12 '12 at 13:30
    
"many strange quirks" ... it would be helpful to list what you think those are. –  Zaid Masud Oct 12 '12 at 13:45
    
It's easier to answer if we know which thread the code executes in, currently it's unknown. And I'm not really sure I understand what the purpose of the code is either. The list of quirks is easier to populate if I know the context and the purpose of the code –  Onkelborg Oct 12 '12 at 15:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.