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I am trying to do a more elegant version of this code. This just basically appends a string to categorynumber depending on the number. Would appreciate any help.

number = [100,150,200,500] 
categoryNumber = []

for i in range (0,len(number)):
    if (number [i] >=1000):
        categoryNumber.append('number > 1000')
    elif (number [i] >=200):
        categoryNumber.append('200 < number < 300')
    elif (number [i] >=100):
        categoryNumber.append('100 < number < 200')
    elif (number [i] >=50):
        categoryNumber.append('50 < number < 100')      
    elif (number [i] < 50):
        categoryNumber.append('number < 50')

for i in range(0,len(categoryNumber)):
    print i
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12  
You never want to do for i in range (0, len(number)) in Python. That's horribly unPythonic. Just do for i in number. –  Daniel Roseman Oct 12 '12 at 14:09
    
What's wrong with using an honest else: for that final clause? –  Donal Fellows Oct 13 '12 at 7:40

7 Answers 7

up vote 10 down vote accepted

How about:

labels = (
    (1000, 'number >= 1000'),
    (200,  '200 <= number < 1000'),
    (100,  '100 <= number < 200'),
    (50,   '50 <= number < 100'),
    (0,    'number < 50'),
)

for i in number:
    for limit, label in labels:
         if i >= limit:
             categoryNumber.append(label)
             break
share|improve this answer
2  
Though you're missing the < 50 case. I'd put the categorization code in a separate function for added readability. –  Jeff Mercado Oct 12 '12 at 14:11
    
@JeffMercado: I could have sworn that was missing in the original question. :-P –  Martijn Pieters Oct 12 '12 at 14:14

how about using bisect?

>>> import bisect
>>> categories = ['number < 50', '50 <= number < 100', '100 <= number < 200', '200 <= number < 300', '300 <= number <1000', 'number >= 1000']
>>> points = [50, 100, 200, 300, 1000]
>>> categories[bisect.bisect(points, 1000)]
'number >= 1000'
>>> categories[bisect.bisect(points, 1)]
'number < 50'
>>> categories[bisect.bisect(points, 50)]
'50 <= number < 100'
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I think this is the best solution... –  Colt 45 Oct 19 '12 at 5:27

Your logic seems to be odd for what you want to do on the second elif, since number[i] is equal to a value grater than 200, eg. 350, it will append the category '200 < number < 300'. Wouldn't it be 200 <= number < 1000 ?

share|improve this answer
    
yes your right it was just a quick eg. it should be 200 <= number < 1000 –  user1741339 Oct 12 '12 at 14:41

You can use operator to do something like this:

import operator
number = [101,151,201,500,1000,45] 
ops={operator.ge:'>=', operator.gt:'>',operator.lt:'<', operator.le:'<='}
cats=(
    (1000, operator.ge,'number >= 1000'),
    (200, operator.ge,'200 <= number < 1000'),
    (100, operator.ge, '100 <= number < 200'),
    (50, operator.ge, '50 <= number < 100'),
    (50, operator.lt, 'number < 50')    
)

for i in number:
    for x, op, label in cats:
        if op(i,x): 
            print '{0:5}{1:^4}{2:5} therefore: {3}'.format(i,ops[op],x,label)
            break

Prints:

  101 >=   100 therefore: 100 <= number < 200
  151 >=   100 therefore: 100 <= number < 200
  201 >=   200 therefore: 200 <= number < 1000
  500 >=   200 therefore: 200 <= number < 1000
 1000 >=  1000 therefore: number >= 1000
   45 <     50 therefore: number < 50

Or you can do it this way:

for n in numbers:
    result = next('{0:5}{1:^4}{2:5} therefore: {3}'.format(n,ops[op],x,label) 
                      for limit, op, label in cats if op(n,limit))
    print result        
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something like this:

number = [199,75,235,1200,25,49,74,200,51,650]
dic={(1000,float('inf')):'number > 1000',
     (200,300):'200 < number < 300',
     (100,200):'100 < number < 200',
     (50,100): '50 < number < 100',
     (0,50): 'number < 50'}

for x in number:
  for y in dic:
    if x>y[0] and x<y[1]:
      print(x,"is",dic[y])

output:

199 is 100 < number < 200
75 is 50 < number < 100
235 is 200 < number < 300
1200 is number > 1000
25 is number < 50
49 is number < 50
74 is 50 < number < 100
51 is 50 < number < 100
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+1 for the idea, -1 for not reading pep8 –  georg Oct 12 '12 at 14:45
    
What about the boundary cases? 200, 50, 1000? –  Martijn Pieters Oct 12 '12 at 20:30
    
@MartijnPieters I guess than changing the condition to if x>=y[0] and x<y[1]: should do it. i.e 200 will print 200 < number < 300, as in his post it is >=200 –  Ashwini Chaudhary Oct 12 '12 at 21:00

Personally, I'm partial to this kind of solution:

number = [100,150,200,500]

def getCategory(num):
    return ['number < 50', '50 <= number < 100', '100 <= number < 200', '200 <= number < 1000', 'number >= 1000'][(num >= 50) + (num >= 100) + (num >= 200) + (num >= 1000)]

categoryNumber = map(getCategory, number)

I understand that readability suffers a bit in the function. I'm also taking advantage of the fact that Python treats "True" as a 1. By adding together the successive comparisons, I find the right entry to return.

Cleaning that up a bit, this is nicer to look at:

number = [100,150,200,500]

def getCategory(num):
    limits = [50, 100, 200, 1000]
    msgList = ['number < 50',
               '50 <= number < 100',
               '100 <= number < 200',
               '200 <= number < 1000',
               'number >= 1000']
    return msgList[reduce(lamdba c, l: c+(num >= l), [0] + limits)]

categoryNumber = map(getCategory, number)

What I like about this is the use of 'map' and 'reduce' make for loops unnecessary.

share|improve this answer

You can simplify the Martijn Pieters's solution. Instead of this procedural piece of code:

for i in number:
    for limit, label in labels:
         if i >= limit:
             categoryNumber.append(label)
             break

You can use quazi-functional:

for number in numbers:
    label = next(label for limit, label in labels if number >= limit)
    categoryNumber.append(label)
share|improve this answer
    
+1: I like that! –  Pyson Oct 12 '12 at 15:50

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