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I'm basically looking for a way to do a variation of this Ruby script in R.
I have an arbitrary list of numbers (steps of a moderator for a regression plot in this case) which have unequal distances from each other, and I'd like to round values which are within a range around these numbers to the nearest number in the list. The ranges don't overlap.

arbitrary.numbers <- c(4,10,15) / 10
numbers <- c(16:1 / 10, 0.39, 1.45)
range <- 0.1

Expected output:

numbers
## 1.6 1.5 1.4 1.3 1.2 1.1 1.0 0.9 0.8 0.7 0.6 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1 0.39 1.45
round_to_nearest_neighbour_in_range(numbers,arbitrary.numbers,range)
## 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.3 1.2 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.8 0.7 0.6 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.2 0.1 0.4 1.5

I've got a little helper function that might do for my specific problem, but it's not very flexible and it contains a loop. I can post it here, but I think a real solution would look completely different.

The different answers timed for speed (on a million numbers)

> numbers = rep(numbers,length.out = 1000000)
> system.time({ mvg.round(numbers,arbitrary.numbers,range) })[3]
elapsed 
  0.067 
> system.time({ rinker.loop.round(numbers,arbitrary.numbers,range) })[3]
elapsed 
  0.289 
> system.time({ rinker.round(numbers,arbitrary.numbers,range) })[3]
elapsed 
  1.403 
> system.time({ nograpes.round(numbers,arbitrary.numbers,range) })[3]
elapsed 
  1.971 
> system.time({ january.round(numbers,arbitrary.numbers,range) })[3]
elapsed 
  16.12 
> system.time({ shariff.round(numbers,arbitrary.numbers,range) })[3]
elapsed 
15.833 
> system.time({ mplourde.round(numbers,arbitrary.numbers,range) })[3]
elapsed 
  9.613 
> system.time({ kohske.round(numbers,arbitrary.numbers,range) })[3]
elapsed 
 26.274 

MvG's function is the fastest, about 5 times faster than Tyler Rinker's second function.

share|improve this question
    
Downvoter, any comment as to why? – Ruben Oct 12 '12 at 15:48
    
Generally benchmarking isn't done in the way you've performed it. You'd want to use the benchmark or rbenchmark package. – Tyler Rinker Oct 12 '12 at 15:52
1  
@TylerRinker I think in this case, the rbenchmark package would be overkill. The differences in times are orders of magnitude. – nograpes Oct 12 '12 at 15:59
1  
@nograpes I'm not quite sure what you mean by "the differences in times are orders of magnitude", but I think I may disagree. It's likely your response will come in first but it would be interesting to see how january, shariff and mplourde's compare. We have no idea from one run what's going on. Maybe this is an old computer, low memory and slow processor and Ruben just happened to also be playing Super Tetris 2000 while running the test. The replication gives us information not just on the fastest solution here but which chunks may serve us well in future programming needs. – Tyler Rinker Oct 12 '12 at 16:07
    
When the differences in time are orders of magnitude, I'd say my choice makes sense. But rinker.round is of course a new contender and dare I say, it might the fastest :-). – Ruben Oct 12 '12 at 16:07
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yet another solution using findInterval:

arbitrary.numbers<-sort(arbitrary.numbers)          # need them sorted
range <- range*1.000001                             # avoid rounding issues
nearest <- findInterval(numbers, arbitrary.numbers - range) # index of nearest
nearest <- c(-Inf, arbitrary.numbers)[nearest + 1]  # value of nearest
diff <- numbers - nearest                           # compute errors
snap <- diff <= range                               # only snap near numbers
numbers[snap] <- nearest[snap]                      # snap values to nearest
print(numbers)

The nearest in the above code is not really mathematically the nearest number. Instead, it is the largest arbitrary number such that nearest[i] - range <= numbers[i], or equivalently nearest[i] <= numbers[i] + range. So in one go we find the largest arbitrary number which is either in the snapping range for a given input number, or still too small for that. For this reason, we only need to check one way for snap. No absolute value required, and even the squaring from a previous revision of this post was unneccessary.

Thanks to Interval search on a data frame for the pointer at findInterval, as I found it there before recognizing it in the answer by nograpes.

If, in contrast to your original question, you had overlapping ranges, you could write things like this:

arbitrary.numbers<-sort(arbitrary.numbers)        # need them sorted
range <- range*1.000001                           # avoid rounding issues
nearest <- findInterval(numbers, arbitrary.numbers) + 1 # index of interval
hi <- c(arbitrary.numbers, Inf)[nearest]          # next larger
nearest <- c(-Inf, arbitrary.numbers)[nearest]    # next smaller
takehi <- (hi - numbers) < (numbers - nearest)    # larger better than smaller
nearest[takehi] <- hi[takehi]                     # now nearest is really nearest
snap <- abs(nearest - numbers) <= range           # only snap near numbers
numbers[snap] <- nearest[snap]                    # snap values to nearest
print(numbers)

In this code, nearestreally ends up being the nearest number. This is achieved by considering both endpoints of every interval. In spirit, this is very much like the version by nograpes, but it avoids using ifelse and NA, which should benefit performance as it reduces the number of branching instructions.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow! This is roughly 16 times faster than Rinker's solution AND it's commented. – Ruben Oct 12 '12 at 17:05

A vectorized solution, without any apply family functions or loops:

The key is findInterval, which finds the "space" in arbitrary.numbers where each element in numbers is "between". So, findInterval(6,c(2,4,7,8)) returns 2, because 6 is between the 2nd and 3rd index of c(2,4,7,8).

# arbitrary.numbers is assumed to be sorted.
# find the index of the number just below each number, and just above.
# So for 6 in c(2,4,7,8) we would find 2 and 3.
low<-findInterval(numbers,arbitrary.numbers) # find index of number just below
high<-low+1 # find the corresponding index just above.

# Find the actual absolute difference between the arbitrary number above and below.
# So for 6 in c(2,4,7,8) we would find 2 and 1. 
# (The absolute differences to 4 and 7).
low.diff<-numbers-arbitrary.numbers[ifelse(low==0,NA,low)]
high.diff<-arbitrary.numbers[ifelse(high==0,NA,high)]-numbers

# Find the minimum difference. 
# In the example we would find that 6 is closest to 7, 
# because the difference is 1.
mins<-pmin(low.diff,high.diff,na.rm=T) 
# For each number, pick the arbitrary number with the minimum difference.
# So for 6 pick out 7.
pick<-ifelse(!is.na(low.diff) & mins==low.diff,low,high)

# Compare the actual minimum difference to the range. 
ifelse(mins<=range+.Machine$double.eps,arbitrary.numbers[pick],numbers)
# [1] 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.3 1.2 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.8 0.7 0.6 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.2 0.1 0.4 1.5
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks, this is the fastest solution, by far. For 1 million numbers it takes ca. 0.8, while the others take 14 (shariff/january) -25 (kohske) – Ruben Oct 12 '12 at 15:12
    
I don't get how it works exactly yet, but I'd like to, so comments would be nice! Not relevant for me, but maybe for others: arbitrary.numbers = sort(arbitrary.numbers) is needed for findInterval to work. – Ruben Oct 12 '12 at 15:30
    
Such beautiful code comments… I'm really being spoiled with good answers here. – Ruben Oct 12 '12 at 16:20

Is this what you want?

> idx <- abs(outer(arbitrary.numbers, numbers, `-`)) <= (range+.Machine$double.eps)
> rounded <- arbitrary.numbers[apply(rbind(idx, colSums(idx) == 0), 2, which)]
> ifelse(is.na(rounded), numbers, rounded)
 [1] 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.3 1.2 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.8 0.7 0.6 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.2 0.1 0.4 1.5
share|improve this answer

Please note that due to rounding errors (most likely), I use range = 0.1000001 to achieve the expected effect.

range <- range + 0.0000001

blah <- rbind( numbers, sapply( numbers, function( x ) abs( x - arbitrary.numbers ) ) )
ff <- function( y ) { if( min( y[-1] ) <= range + 0.000001 ) arbitrary.numbers[ which.min( y[ -1 ] ) ] else  y[1]  }
apply( blah, 2, ff )
share|improve this answer

This is still shorter:

sapply(numbers, function(x) ifelse(min(abs(arbitrary.numbers - x)) > 
range + .Machine$double.eps, x, arbitrary.numbers[which.min
(abs(arbitrary.numbers - x))] ))

Thanks @MvG

share|improve this answer
    
Hint: Use sapply to avoid the unlist. – MvG Oct 12 '12 at 17:21

Another option:

arb.round <- function(numbers, arbitrary.numbers, range) {
    arrnd <- function(x, ns, r){ 
        ifelse(abs(x - ns) <= range +.00000001, ns, x)
    }
    lapply(1:length(arbitrary.numbers), function(i){
            numbers <<- arrnd(numbers, arbitrary.numbers[i], range)
        }
    )
    numbers
}

arb.round(numbers, arbitrary.numbers, range)

Yields:

> arb.round(numbers, arbitrary.numbers, range)
[1] 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.3 1.2 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.8 0.7 0.6 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.2 0.1 0.4 1.5

EDIT: I removed the return call at the end of the function as it's not necessary adn can burn time.

EDIT: I think a loop will be even faster here:

loop.round <- function(numbers, arbitrary.numbers, range) {
    arrnd <- function(x, ns, r){ 
        ifelse(abs(x - ns) <= range +.00000001, ns, x)
    }
    for(i in seq_along(arbitrary.numbers)){
            numbers <- arrnd(numbers, arbitrary.numbers[i], range)
    }
    numbers
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's not the correct solution, as can be seen from your own output. – Ruben Oct 12 '12 at 15:05
1  
It's fixed now. – Tyler Rinker Oct 12 '12 at 15:50

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