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Basically I want the following generic function:

public string StringOrNull<T> (T value)
{
    if (value != null)
    {
       return value.ToString();
    }
    return null;
}

I know I could use a constraint such as where T: class, but T can be a primitive type, Nullable<>, or a class. Is there a generic way to do this?

Edit

Turns out I jumped the gun. This actually works just fine as this sample shows:

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            int i = 7;
            Nullable<int> n_i = 7;
            Nullable<int> n_i_asNull = null;
            String foo = "foo";
            String bar = null;


            Console.WriteLine(StringOrNull(i));
            Console.WriteLine(StringOrNull(n_i));
            Console.WriteLine(StringOrNull(n_i_asNull));
            Console.WriteLine(StringOrNull(foo));
            Console.WriteLine(StringOrNull(bar));


        }

        static private string StringOrNull<T>(T value)
        {
            if (value != null)
            {
                return value.ToString();
            }
            return null;
        }
    }
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3  
What's the problem? It seems to compile for me. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Oct 12 '12 at 14:38
    
@Damien_The_Unbeliever I didn't think I could check a primitive type against null. Maybe I was mistaken. –  grieve Oct 12 '12 at 14:43
1  
@grieve: if you'd tried it you'd have found it worked. If you pass in a value type then it will box it and then check if it is null (which it won't be of course) and then return its string. –  Chris Oct 12 '12 at 14:47
    
@Chris: My bad. I had two levels of indirection, and was getting confused by the error. This does work with primitive and nullables types just fine. –  grieve Oct 12 '12 at 14:50
    
Just as a reminder to myself: mattgemmell.com/2008/12/08/what-have-you-tried –  grieve Oct 12 '12 at 14:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's a fun one:

public static class ExtensionFunctions{
    public static string ToStringOrNull( this object target ) {
        return target != null ? target.ToString() : null;
    }
}

The cool part? This will work:

( (string) null ).ToStringOrNull();

So will this:

 5.ToStringOrNull();

Extension functions are pretty awesome... they even work on null objects!

If you pass a primitive type, it will automatically be boxed, so you don't need to worry about the null comparison. Since boxing occurs automatically, you can even explicitly compare an int to null without an error, but the result will always be false (and you'll probably get a compiler warning telling you so).

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Accepted for the new knowledge of ExtensionFunctions, and reminding me about boxing. I should have remembered that. :) –  grieve Oct 12 '12 at 14:57

default Keyword in Generic Code

In generic classes and methods, one issue that arises is how to assign a default value to a parameterized type T when you do not know the following in advance:

Whether T will be a reference type or a value type.

If T is a value type, whether it will be a numeric value or a struct.

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1  
The method doesn't return T. It returns a string. –  Brian Rasmussen Oct 12 '12 at 14:40

Why generic?

public string StringOrNull (object value)
{
    if (value != null){
       return value.ToString();
    }
    return null;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Do primitives inherit from object? –  grieve Oct 12 '12 at 14:37
    
Example: System.Int32 IS –  lboshuizen Oct 12 '12 at 14:46
1  
@grieve - See my answer: primitives (or value types) are automatically boxed. They do not inherit from object, but they are automatically wrapped in an object thus allowing the comparison to null, etc. –  JDB Oct 12 '12 at 14:53

You can use default keyword to return the default of T:

public string StringOrNull<T> (T value)
{
    .....

    return default(T).ToString();
}
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4  
The method returns a string. –  Brian Rasmussen Oct 12 '12 at 14:38

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