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Why the concept of padding is added only when there are multiple members of a structure and why is it not included when there is a single basic data type member ?

if we consider on a 32bit machine

struct 
{
    char a;
} Y;

There is no padding and sizeof Y comes to 1 byte .

If we consider this structure

struct 
{
    char a;
    int b;
} X;

Sizeof X will be 8bytes .

My question is Why was padding adding in the second case ? If it is for efficient access by the machine which normally reads data in blocks of multiples of 4bytes then why was there no padding in the first case ?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Padding is added in the second case because, on your machine, an int is aligned to 4 bytes. So it has to reside at an address that is divisible to 4.

0x04   0x05   0x06   0x07   0x08   0x09   0x0A   0x0B

  a      b      b      b      b     

If no padding is added, the int member starts at address 0x05, which is wrong. With 3 added padding bytes:

0x04   0x05   0x06   0x07   0x08   0x09   0x0A   0x0B

  a   |      padding      |   b      b      b      b

Now the int is at 0x08, which is OK.

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I <3 ASCII ART! –  Mooing Duck Oct 12 '12 at 15:29
    
Hi, Then how about the case struct { int b; char a; } X; Here if we consider int to start from the memory location in multiple of 4 and char to stat later . Padding is done in this case also . Why a padding is required here if all the datamembers are following the boundary conditions ? –  Laavaa Oct 12 '12 at 15:36
1  
@AbhishekSrinath because of arrays. If you have X x[2], the second element - x[1] - must be aligned to 4 bytes because its first member is an int, which must be aligned to 4 bytes. –  Luchian Grigore Oct 12 '12 at 15:38
    
Oh ! ok Got it ! Thanks @Luchian Grigore –  Laavaa Oct 12 '12 at 16:02
    
+1 for why it is aligned when int b; char a; but not when on char a; –  fayyazkl Oct 13 '12 at 11:33
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It's not just efficiency.

The issue isn't the size of the access per se, but it's alignment. On most machines, accessing misaligned data will cause the program to crash, and on typical machines today, an int will require an address aligned on a four byte boundary: accessing an int whose address is not aligned on a four byte boundary will either slow the program down considerably, or cause it to crash. Your first struct didn't contain any data with alignment considerations, so no padding was necessary. Your second has an int, and the compiler has to ensure that given an array of them, all of the int will be correctly aligned. This means that 1) the total size of the struct must be a multiple of four, and 2) the offset of the int in the struct must be a multiple of four. (Considering the first requirement:

struct S
{
    char a;
    int b;
    char c;
};

will generally have a size of 12, with padding after both char.)

In other langauges, it was frequent for the compiler to reorder structs so that the elements with the strictest alignment requirements came first—for struct S, above, this would have resulted in:

struct S
{
    int b;
    char a;
    char c;
};

and a size of 8, rather than 12. Both C and C++ forbid this, however.

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Hi, Then how about the case struct { int b; char a; } X; Here if we consider int to start from the memory location in multiple of 4 and char to stat later . Padding is done in this case also . Why a padding is required here if all the datamembers are following the boundary conditions ? –  Laavaa Oct 12 '12 at 15:35
    
@AbhishekSrinath So that the next member in an array will be correctly aligned. –  James Kanze Oct 12 '12 at 17:17
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Padding is done to align certain data types, i.e. to insure that data of a certain type has an address that is a multiple of some specified number. This varies between different models of CPU, but often 2-byte integers are aligned to addresses that are multliples of 2 and 4-byte integers to addresses that are multiples of 4. chars do not normally need to be aligned.

So if there is only one field in a structure, then as long as the structure is placed at an address with the proper boundary, there is no need for padding. And it always will be: the system always aligns blocks to the largest boundary that will ever be required, usually 4 bytes or 8 bytes. The one thing in the structure will be at a proper boundary. The issue only comes up when you have multiple fields, as then the length of one field may not result in the next field being at the proper boundary. So in your example, you have a char, which of course takes 1 byte, and an int, which takes 4. Let's suppose the structure is placed at address 0x1000. Then with no padding, the char would be placed at 0x1000 and the int at 0x1001. But int's are more efficient when at 4-byte boundaries, so the compiler adds some pad bytes to push it to the next such boundary, 0x1004. So now you have char (1 byte), padding (3 bytes), int (4 bytes), total 8 bytes.

There's nothing much you can do to improve the situation in this case. Every struct will be aligned to a 4- or 8-byte boundary, so when the minimum is 5 bytes, that's always going to get rounded up to at least 8 in practice. (The sizeof won't show the padding between structs, only within, but the memory is still lost.)

In other cases, you can minimize the number of extra pad bytes by re-arranging the order of the fields. Like say you had three char's and three int's. If you declare the structure as

struct {char a; int b; char c; int d; char e; int f;}

then the compiler will add 3 bytes after the first char to align the first int, and then three more bytes after the second char to align the second int. That gives char (1) + pad (3) + int (4) + char (1) + pad (3) + int (4) + char (1) + pad (3) + int (4) = 24.

But if instead you declared it:

struct {char a; char c; char e; int b; int d; int f;}

then you'd get char (1) + char (1) + char (1) + pad (1) + int (4) + int (4) + int (4) = 16.

Years ago I read the advice to always put the largest elements first to minimize padding, i.e. first put longs, then ints, then shorts, then chars.

If you are allocating thousands or millions of these, you can save a lot of memory by this technique. If you're only going to allocate one or two, it's not going to matter much.

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Hi, Then how about the case struct { int b; char a; } X; Here if we consider int to start from the memory location in multiple of 4 and char to stat later . Padding is done in this case also . Why a padding is required here if all the datamembers are following the boundary conditions ? –  Laavaa Oct 12 '12 at 15:32
    
@AbhishekSrinath If you do a sizeof on that, I think you'll get 5, no hint of any padding. But when you really create such objects, the heap is going to align every object on the worst-case boundary, either 4 or 8, so you're going to end up with an extra 3 bytes to the start of the next object anyway. It might depend whether you're allocating individual objects off the heap, objects on the stack, or arrays. I'm pretty sure that padding is all implementation-dependent, so you may get different results on different systems. The point is to accomodate the CPU's requirements for data alignment. –  Jay Oct 15 '12 at 17:48
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Padding is the concept of alignment,for the issue of computer efficiency and the speed of the access of the data,aligned data are perfectly accessed with the fetching cycle of the processor from the addresses where the data are stored,it doesn't mean that with out alignment processor doesn't work it only meant for the speed access of the memory,for the integer data type it is 4 byte alignment is done by the compiler to access the data more efficiently by the processor.(in 32 bit system)

In case of char only one byte just needed by the data so no need of alignment as each byte itself is available(in RAM there are pages and each page size is 1 byte) but for integer we need 4 byte and no 4 byte is avail able or there is nothing called accessing 4 byte at a time so,compiler making a alignment rule by which the integer data are in the correct addresses.

and by which it will make faster memory access to the data.

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Why do you arbitrarily put words in code/pre-tags? Did you forget to name your sources? –  phresnel Oct 15 '12 at 16:26
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