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I implementing an algorithm to solve the N-Puzzle problem. This algorithm will use other algorithms like A* and an Heuristic Bidirectional Search. In general this both algorithms give to me good results: A* worked finding solution for some problems with more that 50 moves, and i use the other for the other larger solutions.

The problem is the follow: i am using Manhattan Distance as heuristic for both algorithms and seem to work perfectly if the board has no repeated tiles. For example for 3x3 a classic 8-puzzle start board could be 1,2,3|4,5,6|7,8,0, with repeat tiles could be: 1,1,1|2,3,2|1,1,0. But in this case (when the board has repeated tiles) these algorithm works, but is not the same, and take even more time and give larger solutions. I modified the heuristic function and now each tile take the shortest path to any original position, for example if are several 2 each one will calculate the Manhattan distance to its nearest start position that have a 2.

Questions: Any knows any better heuristic for these problems? Is this Manhattan Distance Heuristic still admissible for the problem with repeated elements? Is this another problem different from N-Puzzle?

Thanks...

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Can you please formally define the "n-puzzle with repeated elements"? This is not something "classic", so it requires a formal definition to make sure we are all talking about the same thing. –  amit Oct 12 '12 at 15:17
    
Sorry for delay: With "repeat elements" i means repeat tiles. For example for 3x3 a classic 8-puzzle start board could be 1,2,3|4,5,6|7,8,0, with repeat tiles could be: 1,1,1|2,3,2|1,1,0. This is one of my questions: Is this another problem different from N-Puzzle? –  Raul Otaño Oct 12 '12 at 15:57
    
@RaulOtaño: Please add the explanation to the question and also add what is your heuristic function for this problem exactly is. I suspect you are indeed correct and the heuristic is not admissible. –  amit Oct 12 '12 at 15:59
    
A* with manhattan distance seems like a good solution. I would like to see a better one. –  Ariel Oct 13 '12 at 9:52
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