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What's the most efficient way to calculate the number of days between 2 dates? Basically I'm asking how our favourate datetime libraries are implemented.

I quickly implemented a solution that is ~O(n) as I run through 1 iteration per 4 years. (Code attached below)

I was asked by an intro to problem solving with computers class to implement this, but they're simply iterating through everyday instead of every 4 years.. so I'm not content with that solution and came up with the one below. However, is there a more efficient solution available? If so, how do they accomplish it?

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

#define check_leap(year) ((year % 400 == 0) || ((year % 4 == 0) && (year % 100 != 0)))
#define debug(n) cout << n << endl

int get_days(int month, bool leap){
    if (month == 2){
        if (leap) return 29;
        return 28;
    } else if (month == 1 || month == 3 || month == 5 || month == 7 || month == 8 || month == 10 || month == 12){
        return 31;
    } else {
        return 30;
    }
}


int days[] = {31, 59, 90, 120, 151, 181, 212, 243, 273, 304, 334};

#define days_prior_to_month(n) days[n-2]
int num_days_between(int month1, int day1, int month2, int day2, bool leap){
    if (month2 > month1)
        return ((days_prior_to_month(month2) - days_prior_to_month(month1+1)) + get_days(month1, leap) - day1 + 1 + day2) + ((leap &&  month1 <= 2 && 2 <= month2) ? 1 : 0);
    else if (month2 == month1)
        return day2;
    return -1;
}

int main(int argc, char * argv[]){
    int year, month, day, year2, month2, day2;
    cout << "Year: "; cin >> year;
    cout << "Month: "; cin >> month;
    cout << "Day: "; cin >> day;
    cout << "Year 2: "; cin >> year2;
    cout << "Month 2: "; cin >> month2;
    cout << "Day 2: "; cin >> day2;

    int total = 0;
    if (year2 != year){
        int leapyears = 0;
        total += num_days_between(month, day, 12, 31, check_leap(year));
        debug(total);
        total += num_days_between(1, 1, month2, day2, check_leap(year2));
        debug(total);
        int originalyear = year;
        year++;
        year = year + year % 4;
        while (year <= year2-1){
            leapyears += check_leap(year) ? 1 : 0;
            year += 4;
        }

        total += leapyears * 366;
        debug(total);
        total += max(year2 - originalyear - leapyears - 1, 0) * 365;
        debug(total);

    } else {
        total = num_days_between(month, day, month2, day2, check_leap(year));
    }
        cout << "Total Number of Days In Between: " << total << endl;
    system("PAUSE");
    return 0;
} 
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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can convert a date to a Julian day number in O(1).

Subtract the two Julian day numbers.

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I am amazed a complex 50 line of c++ code become just 3 lines.Thx –  Satbir Oct 13 '13 at 11:31

All division is integer division, operator % is modulus.

Given integer y, m, d, calculate day number g as:

function g(y,m,d)
m = (m + 9) % 12
y = y - m/10
return 365*y + y/4 - y/100 + y/400 + (m*306 + 5)/10 + ( d - 1 )

Difference between two dates = g(y2,m2,d2) - g(y1,m1,d1)
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Can you explain this formula? –  Pwnna Oct 12 '12 at 18:53
    
Explain, as in how does it work or how to code it? I think g() calculates a day number according to the Gregorian calendar. Then the number of days between two dates is the difference between the day numbers. –  Tyler Durden Oct 12 '12 at 19:45
1  
Is there some proof somewhere? –  Pwnna Oct 12 '12 at 20:20
2  
What do I look like? Euclid? You are the student, you prove it. I have answered your two questions: is there a more efficient way to calculate a day difference? YES. How? By the formula shown. –  Tyler Durden Oct 12 '12 at 21:19

Tyler Durden's solution is most elegant, but may need some explanation.

The beauty of the algorithm is the statement:

(m*306 + 5)/10

Which returns the number of days between March 1st, and the start of the 'm'th month after March. (If you want to prove it, just remember to use 'integer division' which truncates decimal parts)

To shoe horn standard dating conventions into this function, input values for month and year are shifted so that the calendar 'starts' in March instead of January.

m = (m + 9) % 12
y = y - m/10

Implementing this handles the problem of calculating "days per month" and leaves only 'days per year' to be calculated. Wikipedia provides sufficient explanation for that part.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leap_year#Algorithm

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The solution is in python, and it shouldn't be hard to convert to any other language.

def isLeapYear(year):
    if year%4 == 0:
        if year%100 == 0:
            if year%400 == 0:
                return True
            else:
                return False
        else:
            return True
    else:
        return False

def daysBetweenDates(year1, month1, day1, year2, month2, day2):
    cumDays = [0,31,59,90,120,151,181,212,243,273,304,334] #cumulative Days by month
    leapcumDays = [0,31,60,91,121,152,182,213,244,274,305,335] # Cumulative Days by month for leap year
    totdays = 0
    if year1 == year2:
        if isLeapYear(year1):
            return (leapcumDays[month2-1] + day2) - (leapcumDays[month1-1] + day1)
        else:
            return (cumDays[month2-1] + day2) - (cumDays[month1-1] + day1)

    if isLeapYear(year1):
        totdays = totdays + 366 - (leapcumDays[month1-1] + day1)
    else:
        totdays = totdays + 365 - (cumDays[month1-1] + day1)

    year = year1 + 1
    while year < year2:
        if isLeapYear(year):
            totdays = totdays + 366
        else:
            totdays = totdays + 365
        year = year + 1

    if isLeapYear(year2):
        totdays = totdays + (leapcumDays[month2-1] + day2)
    else:
        totdays = totdays + (cumDays[month2-1] + day2)
    return totdays
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i wrote this formula based on suggestion from Doug Currie. I tested it till 2147483647 days back from today.

static int daysElapsed(int yearOne,int monthOne,int daysOne,int yearTwo,int monthTwo,int daysTwo)
{
    return (daysTwo-32075+1461*(yearTwo+4800+(monthTwo-14)/12)/4+367*(monthTwo-2-(monthTwo-14)/12*12)/12-3*((yearTwo+4900+(monthTwo-14)/12)/100)/4)-
                   (daysOne-32075+1461*(yearOne+4800+(monthOne-14)/12)/4+367*(monthOne-2-(monthOne-14)/12*12)/12-3*((yearOne+4900+(monthOne-14)/12)/100)/4);            
    }
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