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I'm struggling with a case expression to determine which update statement to make. Is the below even possible or should i make separate update stored procedures for each update?

 IF (SELECT pick FROM warehouse WHERE order_no = @order_no and pick = @pick) is null
    CASE @pick 
    when 1 then
            UPDATE warehouse
            SET pick = @pick, startpickdate=@dchar, startpicktime=@tchar
            where order_no=@order_no
    when 2 then
            UPDATE warehouse
            SET pick = @pick, endpickdate=@dchar, endpicktime=@tchar
            where order_no=@order_no
    when 0 then
            UPDATE warehouse
            SET pick = @pick, endpickdate='', endpicktime='',startpickdate='', startpicktime=''
            where order_no=@order_no
END
GO
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1  
You might want to think about using IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT pick FROM warehouse WHERE order_no = @order_no and pick = @pick). –  Fred Oct 12 '12 at 16:02
    
Which DBMS? I'm assuming SQL Server based upon your other questions. –  Tim Lehner Oct 12 '12 at 16:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want to conditionally update your columns, this approach would work for you

UPDATE Warehouse
SET Pick = @pick
   , startPickDate = CASE @pick
                        WHEN 1 THEN @dchar
                        WHEN 2 THEN startPickDate
                        WHEN 0 THEN ''
                     END
   , startPickTime = CASE @pick
                        WHEN 1 THEN @tchar
                        WHEN 2 THEN startPickTime
                        WHEN 0 THEN ''
                     END
   , ...
WHERE order_no = @order_no
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Works perfectly! –  rich2852 Oct 12 '12 at 15:56
1  
-1 Not semantically the same when @pick not in (0,1,2). Also potential to fire triggers that test UPDATE(<column>) unnecessarily –  RichardTheKiwi Oct 12 '12 at 15:56
    
@RichardTheKiwi You are correct, but you can easily add an ELSE case if you have the potential for values outside of the 0-2 range. Most triggers I have dealt with also check that the Inserted value differs from the Deleted value- you are correct though, certain triggers would pose problems. –  Adam Wenger Oct 12 '12 at 17:02
    
I'm nervous about changing query semantics when dealing with newbies. Because they won't actually understand that things have changed. –  RichardTheKiwi Oct 12 '12 at 17:11
    
@RichardTheKiwi Good point. (Also, thanks for the reason for the -1) –  Adam Wenger Oct 12 '12 at 17:17

CASE is not used for T-SQL control-of-flow. As such, one method is to continue your use of IF (actual control-of-flow), which would allow you to keep your update statements simpler, though there would be one for each branch:

IF (SELECT pick FROM warehouse WHERE order_no = @order_no AND pick = @pick) IS NULL BEGIN
    IF @pick = 1 BEGIN
        UPDATE warehouse
        SET pick = @pick, startpickdate=@dchar, startpicktime=@tchar
        WHERE order_no=@order_no
    END
    ELSE IF @pick = 2 BEGIN
        UPDATE warehouse
        SET pick = @pick, endpickdate=@dchar, endpicktime=@tchar
        WHERE order_no=@order_no
    END
    ELSE IF @pick = 0 BEGIN
        UPDATE warehouse
        SET pick = @pick, endpickdate='', endpicktime='',startpickdate='', startpicktime=''
        WHERE order_no=@order_no
    END
END
GO

If you're in a stored proc anyway, you might find this more maintainable, though that is certainly subjective.

I would probably lean toward this method rather than one big combined update statement using case since you are updating different columns in each case.

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