Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have the following class definition:

 public static string SplitString(string someText)
 {
      var queryArray = Regex.Split(someText, "\\s+(?=\\w+)");
      foreach (var i in Enumerable.Range(0, queryArray.Count - 1)) {
           // Some code
      }
 }

The problem is that queryArray.Count is giving me the following error:

The property 'System.Array.Count' cannot be used in this context because the get accessor is inaccessable.

What am i missing here?

share|improve this question
3  
Should be .Length –  Matthew Oct 12 '12 at 15:45
    
Arrays have a Length property, not a Count, as far as I know. –  Oded Oct 12 '12 at 15:46
    
Instead of var define queryArray as string[] and the IDE will help you with this :) {That you should be using Length on an array instead of Count} –  Rudu Oct 12 '12 at 15:47
1  
As mentioned, there is no Count property on an array. What I'll add is that if you ever see Count being called on an array, it's likely that it's a method (so, it's myArray.Count() < notice the brackets), and that the System.Linq namespace has been added, because that contains the extension method of Count(). –  keyboardP Oct 12 '12 at 15:52
1  
@Paciv Perhaps it is the mono compiler, or an older version of csc.exe. The error suggests that the .Count member is resolving to the explicit implementation of ICollection<T>.Count, but I can't reproduce the error with csc.exe (VS 2012), either. I don't have mono handy to check it out there. –  phoog Oct 12 '12 at 16:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You may try the Length property instead:

public static string SplitString(string someText)
{
    var queryArray = Regex.Split(someText, "\\s+(?=\\w+)");
    foreach (var i in Enumerable.Range(0, queryArray.Length - 1)) {
        // Some code
    }
}

Also your code would probably have been more readable if it was written like this:

public static string SplitString(string someText)
{
    var queryArray = Regex.Split(someText, "\\s+(?=\\w+)");
    for (var i = 0; i < queryArray.Length; i++) {
        // Some code
    }
}

or like this:

public static string SplitString(string someText)
{
    var queryArray = Regex.Split(someText, "\\s+(?=\\w+)");
    foreach (var item in queryArray) {
        // Some code
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer... Now I feel dumb for asking... The issue was that I wasn't getting the standard 'Cannot resolve symbol' error which would indicate that Count method does not exist for Arrays so that had me confused. –  Marko Oct 12 '12 at 17:36

Regex.Split returns an array, which doesn't define a Count property. Use Length instead:

 public static string SplitString(string someText)
 {
      var queryArray = Regex.Split(someText, "\\s+(?=\\w+)");
      foreach (var i in Enumerable.Range(0, queryArray.Length - 1)) {
           // Some code
      }
 }
share|improve this answer

You can try with Length property

share|improve this answer

Why worry about an index when the Select extension will get it for you:

var data = Regex.Split("someText other", "\\s+(?=\\w+)")
                .Select((itm, indexer) => string.Format("{0} is index {1}", itm, indexer));

/* Data has 2 strings in the list:

someText is index 0
other is index 1

*/
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.