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I have to write a simple recursion method to calculate m(i) = (1/2) + (2/3) + ... + i/(i+1). I feel like this should be incredibly simple, but I cannot figure it out. I know that I have to loop by decrementing, but I just can't get it. So far I have the following, which I know is completely wrong.

public class Recursion {
    public static void main(String[] args) {

        double n = run(10);
        System.out.print("Result: " + n);
    }

    public static double run(double nb) {
        double result = 0;

        if(nb == 2){
            return 1/2;
        }

        result += run(nb - 2) / run(nb - 1);
        return result;

    }

}
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Never compare double values using ==. 2 floating point values (almost) never equal. –  AlexR Oct 12 '12 at 16:06
    
@AlexR - Unless the numbers are very large, add, subtract, and multiply of doubles that happen to be exact integer values will produce exact integer values. Furthermore, comparing double values that are known to be exact integers (as in this case) can be safely done using ==. (However, double values don't need to be compared at all; see my answer.) –  Ted Hopp Oct 12 '12 at 17:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use this recurrence relation:

m(i) = i/(i+1) + m(i-1)

In code, it might look like this:

public static double run(int i) {
    if (i < 1) {
        return 0;
    }
    return i / (i + 1.0) + run(i - 1);
}

Note that there's no need for the argument to be floating point, just the return value.

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That did it, and that makes sense. Thank you so much! –  Vaindil Oct 12 '12 at 16:21

Try this:

public class Recursion{
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        double n = run(10);
        System.out.print("Result: " + n);
    }

    public static double run(double nb) {
        double result = 0;
        if(nb > 1){
            result = nb/(nb + 1) + run(nb - 1);
        } else{
            result = nb/(nb + 1);
        }
        return result;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You're off with your terminating condition. The recursion will overflow the stack if nb < 2 and it returns the wrong value for nb == 2 (returning 1/2 when it should return 7/6). –  Ted Hopp Oct 12 '12 at 16:14
    
That's exactly the problem I'm getting, but I don't know how to fix it. –  Vaindil Oct 12 '12 at 16:19
    
I think I've got it now –  Bob Dylan Oct 12 '12 at 16:20

trying a bit math should make this simple.

m(i) = 1/2 + 2/3 +....+(i)/(i+1)
or m(i) = 2/2-1/2 + 3/3-1/3 + ....+ (i+1)/(i+1) - 1/(i+1)
or m(i) = 1-1/2 + 1 - 1/3 +...(i times)..+ 1 - (1/(i+1))
or m(i) = i - ( 1/2 + 1/3 + ... + 1/(i+1) )

Now it should be easy to write a algorithm for this.

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How does this help with writing a recursive solution? –  Ted Hopp Oct 12 '12 at 16:17

I think you should replace this

result += run(nb - 2) / run(nb - 1);

By

result += nb - 2 / nb - 1;
return result + run(nb - 1);
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