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I need the send and integer to a function and then append that to the end of a constant character.

int main (void)
{
    append(1);
}

int append(int input)
{
    const char P = 'P';

    //This where I want to append 1 to P to create "P1"'
}
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1  
'P1' is not a character. It's a string (or an array of characters). –  raina77ow Oct 12 '12 at 16:40
    
Yes you are correct. I want to create a new string that reads as "P1" based on my char and the int input. it has to be"P1" as a single term. –  arynhard Oct 12 '12 at 16:44
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7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

No matter what you do, you need to convert the number to a string, otherwise you can't create a string containing both numbers.

You can actually combine both the concatenation and the int-to-string conversion in one function call: sprintf:

char output[16];
sprintf(output, "P%d", input);
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Thi is close to what I want, however, I would like to use the new "P1" in a bitwise operation. (SEE EDIT ABOVE). –  arynhard Oct 12 '12 at 16:52
1  
@arynhard - don't change the question after you ask it, doing so invalidates correct answers –  KevinDTimm Oct 12 '12 at 16:53
    
My apologies but I thought the first one was clear enough. I tried to keep as simple as possible. –  arynhard Oct 12 '12 at 16:57
    
You've created a brand new question with your modifications - Joachim's solution perfectly answers the original –  KevinDTimm Oct 12 '12 at 17:01
    
@KevinDTimm - Joachim made that clear, thanks. However I never said I wanted to print it. Just combine the two. –  arynhard Oct 12 '12 at 17:02
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I'm not an expert on C, but I don't believe constants should be changed once they are defined.

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I don't necassarily want to change a constant. I want to append "P" to what number is input and then create a new string "P+input" –  arynhard Oct 12 '12 at 16:42
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Not sure if you can add something to a const chat (since its a const).

But why not:

char p[3];
sprintf(p, "P%d",input);
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You cannot assign more than one character value to a char. For doing that you would have to take a string. Maybe like this.

int append(int input)
{
  const char P = 'P';

 //This where I want to append 1 to P to create "P1"
char app[2] ;  //extend that for your no. of digits
app[0] = P '
app[1] = (char) input  ;
}

This is for one digit. You can allocate dynamic memory for big integers and do the same in a loop.

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Note that printing this string is undefined behaviour since it is not null-terminated. –  Niklas R Oct 12 '12 at 16:48
    
I never posted the whole or exact code, just gave a hint. And mentioned at the end to extend that as well. –  Coding Mash Oct 12 '12 at 16:49
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What about using strncat?

See a working example on codepad: http://codepad.org/xdwhH0ss

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I'd insert the code if I wasn't on a smartphone. Was hard enough to write the code, being still unfamiliar with the android keyboard. –  Niklas R Oct 12 '12 at 17:04
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I would convert the number to a string (assuming you have access to a function called itoa in this example and concatenate it to the character. If you don't have access to itoa you could sprintf instead.

itoa method:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

char *foo(const char ch, const int i)
{
    char *num, *ret;
    int c = i;

    if(c <= 0) c++;
    if(c == 0) c++;
    while(c != 0)
    {
        c++;
        c /= 10;
    }
    c += 1;
    if(!(num = malloc(c)))
    {
        fputs("Memory allocation failed.", stderr);
        exit(1);
    }
    if(!(ret = malloc(c + 1)))
    {
        fputs("Memory allocation failed.", stderr);
        free(num);
        exit(1);
    } 
    itoa(i, num, 10);
    ret[0] = ch;
    ret[1] = 0x00;
    strcat(ret, num);
    free(num);
    return ret;
}

int main(void)
{
    char *result;

    if(!(result = foo('C', 20))) exit(1);
    puts(result);
    free(result);
    return 0;
 }

sprintf method:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

char *foo(const char ch, const int i)
{
    char *num, *ret;
    int c = i;

    if(c <= 0) c++;
    if(c == 0) c++;
    while(c != 0)
    {
        c++;
        c /= 10;
    }
    c += 1;
    if(!(num = malloc(c)))
    {
        fputs("Memory allocation failed.", stderr);
        exit(1);
    }
    if(!(ret = malloc(c + 1)))
    {
        fputs("Memory allocation failed.", stderr);
        free(num);
        exit(1);
    } 
    sprintf(num, "%d", i);
    ret[0] = ch;
    ret[1] = 0x00;
    strcat(ret, num);
    free(num);
    return ret;
}

int main(void)
{
    char *result;

    if(!(result = foo('C', 20))) exit(1);
    puts(result);
    free(result);
    return 0;
 }

I compiled and tested both of these and they seem to work quite nicely. Good luck.

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Do something like that:

int main (void)
{
    char str[3]; 
    append(1, &str);
}

void append(int num, char* input)
{
    input[0] = 'P';
    input[1] = (char)num;
    input[2] = NULL; //or 0
}

I'd suggest you'll build it more generic.

Good luck!

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The request is to send an integer, not a digit - your method fails quickly –  KevinDTimm Oct 12 '12 at 16:51
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