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I'm studying the DTMF code at http://sourceforge.net/projects/dtmf/. I've come across some C++ code that I'm having trouble understanding:

template<int, int, int, int> class Types;
template <> class Types<5, 4, 2, 1>
{
public:
        typedef long int Int40;
        typedef unsigned long int Uint40;
        typedef int Int32;
        typedef unsigned int Uint32;
        typedef short int Int16;
        typedef unsigned short int Uint16;
        typedef char Int8;
        typedef unsigned char Uint8;
};
template <> class Types<8, 4, 2, 1>
{
public:
        typedef long int Int64;
        typedef unsigned long int Uint64;
        typedef int Int32;
        typedef unsigned int Uint32;
        typedef short int Int16;
        typedef unsigned short int Uint16;
        typedef char Int8;
        typedef unsigned char Uint8;
};
template <> class Types<4, 4, 2, 1>
{
public:
        typedef int Int32;
        typedef unsigned int Uint32;
        typedef short int Int16;
        typedef unsigned short int Uint16;
        typedef char Int8;
        typedef unsigned char Uint8;
};

// For 16bit chars
template <> class Types<2, 1, 1, 1>
{
public:
        typedef long int Int32;
        typedef unsigned long int Uint32;
        typedef short int Int16;
        typedef unsigned short int Uint16;
};

typedef Types<sizeof(long int), sizeof(int), sizeof(short int), sizeof(char)>::Int32     INT32;
typedef Types<sizeof(long int), sizeof(int), sizeof(short int), sizeof(char)>::Uint32    UINT32;
typedef Types<sizeof(long int), sizeof(int), sizeof(short int), sizeof(char)>::Int16     INT16;
typedef Types<sizeof(long int), sizeof(int), sizeof(short int), sizeof(char)>::Uint16    UINT16;

From there, they are used just like normal primitive types:

static const INT16 tempCoeff[8];

My gut feeling tells me that all this stuff achieves some sort of cross-platform portability. Am I right, or is there more to it?

share|improve this question
3  
Yep, standardizing byte-sizes across platforms –  im so confused Oct 12 '12 at 16:56
1  
It looks like he's handling different architectural models in a particularly convoluted way, e.g. 8, 4, 2, 1 is 8 byte long, 4 byte int, 2 byte short and 1 byte char. I'm not sure why you wouldn't just use <stdint.h> ? –  Paul R Oct 12 '12 at 16:57
1  
@Paul R I have a strange recollection that MS compilers don't provide stdint.h. –  Mark B Oct 12 '12 at 17:00
1  
Five-byte long? I wonder what machine that is. –  Robᵩ Oct 12 '12 at 17:08
1  
@Rob: probably a DSP (TI I would guess) –  Paul R Oct 12 '12 at 17:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It looks like they're reinventing stdint.h (which I believe isn't supported in some/many versions of MS compilers) by providing a somewhat portable mechanism for integral types of certain sizes based on calls to sizeof. Note that the fourth template parameter that accepts sizeof(char) is completely useless as sizeof(char) is always 1.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, Microsoft does not care about C and never implemented C99 and C++ only adopted stdint in C++11 which Microsoft is last to implement (Clang has support almost complete, gcc closely follows, VisualC++ has maybe half of features). –  Jan Hudec Oct 12 '12 at 17:04
    
Plus there are many systems that simply have ancient compilers. Various embedded systems often get compiler update once in many years. –  Jan Hudec Oct 12 '12 at 17:05
    
+1 for sizeof(char). Always get me worried when someone wishes to provide a "framework" and trips on the fundamentals... (and the fact that a signed type is used for the result of sizeof is not particularly tasteful either). –  Matthieu M. Oct 12 '12 at 17:38

Let's see if we can devise a little bit more sane approach (requires that CHAR_BIT is correctly defined for the platform):

namespace portable_inttypes
{
    template<typename Tchain, typename T, typename Tun, size_t Tsize = sizeof (T) * CHAR_BIT, bool atleast64 = Tsize >= 64>
    struct autodef_helper64 : Tchain {};

    template<typename Tchain, typename T, typename Tun, size_t Tsize>
    struct autodef_helper64<Tchain, T, Tun, Tsize, true> : Tchain
    {
        typedef T int_least64_t;
        typedef Tun uint_least64_t;
    };

    template<typename Tchain, typename T, typename Tun>
    struct autodef_helper64<Tchain, T, Tun, 64, true> : Tchain
    {
        typedef T int64_t, int_least64_t;
        typedef Tun uint64_t, uint_least64_t;
    };

    template<typename Tchain, typename T, typename Tun, size_t Tsize = sizeof (T) * CHAR_BIT, bool atleast32 = Tsize >= 32>
    struct autodef_helper32 : autodef_helper64<Tchain, T, Tun> {};

    template<typename Tchain, typename T, typename Tun, size_t Tsize>
    struct autodef_helper32<Tchain, T, Tun, Tsize, true> : autodef_helper64<Tchain, T, Tun>
    {
        typedef T int_least32_t;
        typedef Tun uint_least32_t;
    };

    template<typename Tchain, typename T, typename Tun>
    struct autodef_helper32<Tchain, T, Tun, 32, true> : autodef_helper64<Tchain, T, Tun>
    {
        typedef T int32_t, int_least32_t;
        typedef Tun uint32_t, uint_least32_t;
    };

    template<typename Tchain, typename T, typename Tun, size_t Tsize = sizeof (T) * CHAR_BIT, bool atleast32 = Tsize >= 16>
    struct autodef_helper16 : autodef_helper32<Tchain, T, Tun> {};

    template<typename Tchain, typename T, typename Tun, size_t Tsize>
    struct autodef_helper16<Tchain, T, Tun, Tsize, true> : autodef_helper32<Tchain, T, Tun>
    {
        typedef T int_least16_t;
        typedef Tun uint_least16_t;
    };

    template<typename Tchain, typename T, typename Tun>
    struct autodef_helper16<Tchain, T, Tun, 16, true> : autodef_helper32<Tchain, T, Tun>
    {
        typedef T int16_t, int_least16_t;
        typedef Tun uint16_t, uint_least16_t;
    };

    template<typename Tchain, typename T, typename Tun, size_t Tsize = sizeof (T) * CHAR_BIT, bool atleast8 = Tsize >= 8>
    struct autodef_helper8 : autodef_helper16<Tchain, T, Tun> {};

    template<typename Tchain, typename T, typename Tun, size_t Tsize>
    struct autodef_helper8<Tchain, T, Tun, Tsize, true> : autodef_helper16<Tchain, T, Tun>
    {
        typedef T int_least8_t;
        typedef Tun uint_least8_t;
    };

    template<typename Tchain, typename T, typename Tun>
    struct autodef_helper8<Tchain, T, Tun, 8, true> : autodef_helper16<Tchain, T, Tun>
    {
        typedef T int8_t, int_least8_t;
        typedef Tun uint8_t, uint_least8_t;
    };

    struct autodef_base {};
    typedef autodef_helper8<autodef_base, long long, unsigned long long> autodef_longlong;
    typedef autodef_helper8<autodef_longlong, long, unsigned long> autodef_long;
    typedef autodef_helper8<autodef_long, int, unsigned> autodef_int;
    typedef autodef_helper8<autodef_int, short, unsigned short> autodef_short;
    typedef autodef_helper8<autodef_short, signed char, unsigned char> autodef_char;
}

typedef portable_inttypes::autodef_char inttypes;

int main(void)
{
    return sizeof(inttypes::uint32_t);
}
share|improve this answer

This code works out the sizes of the different basic scalar types, and defines a few types depending on it.

So yes, it is used for cross-platform compatibility. Why it is used that way, though, is beyond my understanding.

share|improve this answer
    
Is there a better way to do it? –  misha Oct 12 '12 at 16:59
    
This is usually done with a bunch of macros (that's what stdint.h does). The issue with this code is that it handles four specific types of architectures, and pathetically breaks if the sizes don't match one of the patterns. –  Mr. kbok Oct 12 '12 at 17:01
    
Glad to hear that it's not the standard way to handle such a problem. I was thinking about macros as well. –  misha Oct 12 '12 at 17:05
    
@misha: The standard is rather new. Microsoft never bothered to implement C99 that introduced this and C++11 is brand new; you still need to support C++03 based on C89 in many cases and than this is a good way to go. –  Jan Hudec Oct 12 '12 at 17:09
    
@misha: See my answer (not tested) for a way to automatically define the size-specific types based on the platform. –  Ben Voigt Oct 12 '12 at 17:54

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