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I have this code which returns the result I want:

SELECT CONCAT('#', id, ' ', firstname, ' ', lastname, ' (', company, ')') AS result FROM client_detail 

Here are the results:

#1 James Hadley (OpenBill)
#2 Lucinda Hadley (Make a Squish)

But when trying to search in the same string when using LIKE (I want to search for a variable string anywhere inside the above results), I get no output and no errors:

SELECT CONCAT('#', id, ' ', firstname, ' ', lastname, ' (', company, ')') AS result FROM client_detail WHERE CONCAT('#', id, ' ', firstname, ' ', lastname, ' (', company, ')') LIKE '%jam%' ORDER BY id ASC

I am right to use the LIKE operand, or is there a better/correct way of searching inside the result?

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What happens if you change the 'where' clause to a 'having'? Im not sure those values exist for concat-ing yet. –  ethrbunny Oct 12 '12 at 17:25
    
This is valid SQL, and should get you what you want. What is the error you're receiving? –  Thomas Kelley Oct 12 '12 at 17:28
1  
@tomtheman5: "I get no output and no errors". However, I do agree that the OP should be getting what he wants: sqlfiddle.com/#!2/2734e/1/0 (unless the connection's collation is case-sensitive). –  eggyal Oct 12 '12 at 17:30
1  
Yep it was case-sensitive - that was the problem! –  user1497049 Oct 12 '12 at 17:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

MySQL's CONCAT statement will use the system default for collations. If your table is defined as UTF-8 but your system is latin1 then your LIKE statement may choose a case-sensitive collation.

Force a case-insensitive match using LOWER (Using HAVING to take advantage of your alias result):

SELECT CONCAT('#',id,' ',firstname,' ',lastname,' (', company, ')') AS result
  FROM client_detail 
HAVING LOWER(result) LIKE '%jam%'    
 ORDER BY id ASC

Or use a COLLATION (will depend on your system)

...
HAVING result LIKE '%jam%' COLLATE latin1_general_ci
...
share|improve this answer
    
"MySQL's LIKE statement is case-sensitive." - No it isn't. It depends on the collation of the operands. –  eggyal Oct 12 '12 at 17:32
    
@eggyal Although LIKE isn't case sensitive - in this case it appears to be. Please try this example and see for yourself. –  CoffeeMonster Oct 12 '12 at 17:39
    
In my case it does appear to be case-sentitive. I'll use the above code to convert the case and tidy the whole thing up. Thank you very much! –  user1497049 Oct 12 '12 at 17:39
    
My mysql version (5.0.83) defaults to a latin1 based COLLATION with CONCAT even though the system and table are defined as utf8_general_ci. You could try using a latin1 case-insensitive COLLATION like HAVING result LIKE '%jam%' COLLATE latin1_general_ci –  CoffeeMonster Oct 12 '12 at 17:54

Rather than converting case, which is an expensive operation, you could instead force use of a case-insensitive collation:

SELECT   CONCAT('#', id, ' ', firstname, ' ', lastname, ' (', company, ')')
           AS result
FROM     client_detail
WHERE    CONCAT('#', id, ' ', firstname, ' ', lastname, ' (', company, ')')
           LIKE '%jam%' COLLATE utf8_general_ci
ORDER BY id ASC

However, this is still extremely expensive as it requires that the concatenation and search is performed for every record in the table: indexing is useless.

Perhaps it's possible to rephrase the query to take better advantage of indexes (if they exist):

SELECT   CONCAT('#', id, ' ', firstname, ' ', lastname, ' (', company, ')')
           AS result
FROM     client_detail
WHERE    firstname LIKE 'jam%' COLLATE utf8_general_ci
      OR lastname  LIKE 'jam%' COLLATE utf8_general_ci
      OR company   LIKE 'jam%' COLLATE utf8_general_ci
ORDER BY id ASC

Albeit this query only searches for 'jam' at the start of each field, rather than being some substring within them.

share|improve this answer
    
The first solution here works much better actually. Thank you! –  user1497049 Oct 12 '12 at 17:51
    
@user1497049: You might want to investigate why you were defaulting to a case-sensitive collation. Perhaps check the table design and your connection settings. –  eggyal Oct 12 '12 at 17:52

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