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I am experimenting with some 3d rendering in Python. I keep reading that Python is soooooooo very slow! I simply MUST harness the C-awesomeness of Numpy for all the matrix stuff I can't do in the shaders! Otherwise nothing will work, yadda, yadda (paraphrasing here..).

BUT: I did some testing!

Here's a random matrix, once in Numpy-flavour:

matrix1 = numpy.matrix([[1, 1, 0, 0,], [0, 1, 0, 0], [0, 0, 1, 1], [0, 0, 0, 1]])
>>> matrix([[1, 1, 0, 0],
            [0, 1, 0, 0],
            [0, 0, 1, 1],
            [0, 0, 0, 1]])

and once as a bog-standard tuple:

matrix2 = (1, 1, 0, 0,\
      0, 1, 0, 0,\
      0, 0, 1, 1,\
      0, 0, 0, 1)

Now, if I want the inverse of that, I can either do it in Numpy:

def inv_1():
    return matrix1.I

or as pure Python (I omitted some of the maths because it hurts my head):

def inv_2():
    m0, m1, m2, m3, \
    m4, m5, m6, m7, \
    m8, m9, m10, m11, \
    m12, m13, m14, m15 = matrix2

    A0 = (( m0 *  m5) - ( m1 *  m4))  ....
 ...B5 = ((m10 * m15) - (m11 * m14))

    det = 1.0 / det
    return (
        (+ ( m5 * B5) - ( m6 * B4) + ( m7 * B3)) * det, ...
     ...(+ ( m8 * A3) - ( m9 * A1) + (m10 * A0)) * det
    )

both work fine:

inv_1()
>>>> matrix([[ 1., -1.,  0.,  0.],
             [ 0.,  1.,  0.,  0.],
             [ 0.,  0.,  1., -1.],
             [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  1.]])

inv_2()
>>>> (1.0, -1.0, 0.0, 0.0, 
      0.0, 1.0, 0.0, 0.0, 
      0.0, 0.0, 1.0, -1.0,
      0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 1.0)   (I added the line-breaks here for clarity)

But the pure Python code runs consistently about ten times faster than the highly praised Numpy:

timeit.timeit(inv_1, number=100000)
>>>> 3.0659120082855225

timeit.timeit(inv_2, number=100000)
>>>> 0.4014430046081543

And if you add the overhead of converting my beautiful tuple-matrices into Numpy matrices it will be even slower.

So what's going on here? Am I doing something wrong? Is it all due to the overhead of invoking a C-function? Did the guy who's inversion-code I stole break the laws of physics?

Thanks for de-noobing me! Love you all!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You're inverting the matrix analytically (which is possible since you know the dimensions and since they're not too big). numpy must invert the matrix using some other (numerical) algorithm which works if the matrix is 4x4 as well as 10000x10000. In other words, the general problem is much harder than the simple 4x4 case that you have.

share|improve this answer
    
my thoughts exactly –  Iliyan Bobev Oct 12 '12 at 17:46
    
A great point! What's slow isn't so much the language as the algorithm. Python is perfectly acceptable for small N especially since you can craft a fast algorithm for that specific case. –  Thane Brimhall Oct 12 '12 at 17:50
4  
@ThaneBrimhall -- Yeah, however, I'm a little worried that the "analytical" version might not be numerically stable when implemented numerically (Unless the author built in some form of pivoting )...Although, it's been quite a while since I've worked with any matrix inversion algorithms, so my memory is probably a little rusty on that one... –  mgilson Oct 12 '12 at 17:52
    
ah excellent, hadn't thought of that. Thank you! –  Jan Oct 15 '12 at 9:16

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