Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

this is a followup question arising from this solution. The solution to count adjacent cells works pretty well unless you have multiple patches in the array.

So this time the array for instance looks like this.

import numpy
from scipy import ndimage

s = ndimage.generate_binary_structure(2,2)
a = numpy.zeros((6,6), dtype=numpy.int) # example array
a[1:3, 1:3] = 1;a[2:4,4:5] = 1
print a
[0 0 0 0 0 0]
[0 1 1 0 0 0]
[0 1 1 0 1 0]
[0 0 0 0 1 0]
[0 0 0 0 0 0]
[0 0 0 0 0 0]

# Number of nonoverlapping cells
c = ndimage.binary_dilation(a,s).astype(a.dtype)
b = c - a
numpy.sum(b) # returns 19
# However the correct number of non overlapping cells should be 22 (12+10)

Is there any smart solution to solve this dilemma without using any loops or iterating through the array? The reason is that the array could be quite big.

idea 1:

Just thought over it and a way to do it might be to check for more than one patch in the iterating structure. For the total count number to be correct those cells below have to be equal 2 (or more) in the dilation. Anyone got any idea how to turn this thought into code?

[1 1 1 1 0 0]
[1 0 0 2 1 1]
[1 0 0 2 0 1]
[1 1 1 2 0 1]
[0 0 0 1 1 1]
[0 0 0 0 0 0]
share|improve this question
    
What you got are the non-overlapping cells? Do you want them really individually for each patch? IE. what would you even want if you add a[1,3:5] = 1 to your a? –  seberg Oct 12 '12 at 19:14
    
see the answers in the other question. The array a above is just an example. My real arrays are really big and contain many cell patches of values –  Curlew Oct 12 '12 at 19:22
    
I'm quite confused, because you indicated that scipy.signal.convolve2d solved your previous problem -- but that counts all overlapping values. Now it seems you want not to count overlaps, except when those overlaps result from non-contiguous blocks of 1s. That's a totally different requirement. So your previous question doesn't really help explain what you want now. –  senderle Oct 12 '12 at 19:25
    
Does really huge mean you have many patches of ones or large patches? If they are few, I think my solution should work perfectly well –  deinonychusaur Oct 12 '12 at 19:28
    
ohh sorry, back then i calculated the number of cells with overlaps, which also was the original question. Therefore this was the correct answer. No i want to calculate non-overlapping adjacent cells with multiple patches of values in an array. Huge means that the array is large and there are many different structured patches –  Curlew Oct 12 '12 at 19:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can use label from ndimage to segment each patch of ones.

Then you just ask where the returned array equals 1, 2, 3 etc and perform your algoritm on it (or you just use the ndimage.distance_transform_cdt but with inverting your forground/background for each labeled segment.

Edit 1:

This code will take your array a and do what you ask:

b, c = ndimage.label(a)
e = numpy.zeros(a.shape)
for i in xrange(c):

    e += ndimage.distance_transform_cdt((b == i + 1) == 0) == 1

print e

I realize it is a bit ugly with all the equals there but it outputs:

In [41]: print e
[[ 1.  1.  1.  1.  0.  0.]
 [ 1.  0.  0.  2.  1.  1.]
 [ 1.  0.  0.  2.  0.  1.]
 [ 1.  1.  1.  2.  0.  1.]
 [ 0.  0.  0.  1.  1.  1.]
 [ 0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.]]

Edit 2 (Alternative solution):

This code should do the same stuff and hopefully faster (however it will not find the where two patches only touch corners).

b = ndimage.binary_closing(a) - a
b = ndimage.binary_dilation(b.astype(bool))

c = ndimage.distance_transform_cdt(a == 0) == 1

e = c.astype(numpy.int) * b + c

print e
share|improve this answer
    
and you want the chessboard setting (default) of the distance transform btw. –  deinonychusaur Oct 12 '12 at 19:21
    
mhh, i know of the label function. Iam just reading through the doc of ndimage.distance_transform_cdt. Could you provide an example what you mean? My problem right now is that the counting of values by numpy.sum doesn't count adjacent cells patchwise –  Curlew Oct 12 '12 at 19:31
    
yeah, this works exactly like i wanted it. thanks. Although i still have no idea what the distance_transform_cdt does :-) –  Curlew Oct 12 '12 at 19:38
1  
the distance_transform_cdt is a really nifty algorithm that will give the distance to the object for all non-object positions. Distance can be measured in many ways, and chessboard means it will give it in number of king's moves like if you were playing chess. So that is why I ask for the positions that return 1. (The taxicab would have needed to go two blocks for finding those of the corners (because it can't go diagonals)) –  deinonychusaur Oct 12 '12 at 19:41
1  
if the restriction I put in the second solution is okay for your application, then I think it should be a faster algorithm. –  deinonychusaur Oct 12 '12 at 20:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.