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With the function:

int five(int n)
{
    if ((n%5)==0)
        return 1;
    else
        return 0;
}

Why are the limitations of this positive numbers only even if there is no remainder?

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6  
I don't understand what you mean. It works for all int values. (Better would be return n % 5 == 0;, though) –  Daniel Fischer Oct 12 '12 at 18:47

1 Answer 1

for n == -2, some hardware will compute n%5 as 3, while other hardware evaluates it as 2. To accommodate that , the standard leaves % ambiguous for negative values.

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4  
“the standard leaves % ambiguous for negative values.” Not since C99. Division rounds towards zero and modulo is defined such that (a/b)*b + a%b equals a. (6.5.5:6) –  Pascal Cuoq Oct 12 '12 at 18:51
    
by mathematical definition -2%5 == 3 == (-2+5)%5, mathforum.org/library/drmath/view/52343.html –  0x90 Oct 12 '12 at 18:55
2  
@0x90 % operator in C is a remainder and not a modulo operator. –  ouah Oct 12 '12 at 18:58

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