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I have this code:

double i;
while(cin >> i)
{
    if ( i < 0.0)
        cout << "ENTER A POSITIVE NUMBER: ";
    else
        break;
}

I want code like this ( I don't want to use break):

while((cin >> i) < 0.0)
{
    cout << "ENTER A POSITIVE NUMBER: ";
}

I get an error on this line: while((cin >> i) < 0.0) saying invalid operands to binary expression.

What am I missing?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The expression (cin >> i) does not return a double.

You can write the same statement, without a break, as:

double i;
while ((cin >> i) && (i < 0.0)) {
    cout << "ENTER A POSITIVE NUMBER: "; 
}
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It does not return boolean. cplusplus.com/reference/iostream/istream/operator%3E%3E –  Coding Mash Oct 12 '12 at 19:00
    
@CodingMash: My mistake, edited it. Thanks! –  aam1r Oct 12 '12 at 19:02
    
Reverting the -1 as the code is correct. You might want to revisit the explanation, as cin >> i does not yield a boolean value, but a reference to the stream (which can be then converted to a bool) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 12 '12 at 19:05
    
This is all good, simple practice for you guys. It was all about my oversight regarding the while and boolean. –  duknov007 Oct 12 '12 at 19:10

Use it like this.

while ((cin >> i) && (i < 0.0))

The overloaded function for cin returns an object by reference of istream class. So you cannot compare it to a double value.

cin >> i
|-------| //this is an object of istream class
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1  
+1, it is important to note that && is a sequence point (old C++03 parlance) and thus it is guaranteed that (i<0.0) will only be evaluated after cin >> i. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 12 '12 at 19:00
    
This was it; I overlooked that fact that while does a bool check. Makes total sense. –  duknov007 Oct 12 '12 at 19:07

you want to check the value of i, not the return of cin

while((cin >> i) && ( i < 0.0))
{
    cout << "ENTER A POSITIVE NUMBER: ";
}
share|improve this answer

The return value of cin >> i is the stream, not the read value. This is to allow chaining of operands

cin >> i >> j;

You could try this:

while( (cin >> i, i) < 0. )
{
    cout << "ENTER A POSITIVE NUMBER: ";
}

The comma operator should return the value of i but I haven't tested it.

EDIT: Don't use this approach, as David Rodríguez has noted this discards the result of the read. Use while( (cin >>i) && (i<0.) ) instead.

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1  
-1 The problem with this approach is that it completely ignores the result of the read. Say that i is negative and the user closes the input stream (or types a letter which fails to parse as a double and sets the fail bit in the stream), then the subsequent reads will fail, and the value of i will not be updated being still positive in an infinite loop. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 12 '12 at 19:02
    
Yes, I used the while((cin >> i) && (i < 0)) –  duknov007 Oct 12 '12 at 19:36

Do:

while( cin >> i && i < 0.0 )
{
    cout << "ENTER A POSITIVE NUMBER: ";
}

The error is caused due to the fact that the expression (cin >> i) is not valid for comparison with a double.

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It's been a while since I've played with operator,; are you guaranteed that cin >> i is run before the i < 0.0 when the thing on the left of the comma is an object? –  Max Lybbert Oct 12 '12 at 19:00
1  
Same issue as with Alex. The comma operator discards the first expression. If the input is -1 a you run into an infinite loop. In the first iteration i is set to -1, after that the read fails, i is unmodified and you enter an infinite loop. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 12 '12 at 19:03
1  
@MaxLybbert: Yes, that is guaranteed by the standard, but this answer has other issues. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 12 '12 at 19:07
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas: thanks for the clarification. –  Max Lybbert Oct 12 '12 at 19:20

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