Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is the cod I have so far:

public class Laboratoire05E {
public static void main(String[] args) {

    int number = 0;
    int counter = 0;

     do {
        bin = (int) (Math.random()*2);
        System.out.print(bin);
        counter++;

        if(counter>=80) {
            System.out.print("\n");
            counter = counter-80;
            }
        } while (bin < 2);
}

}

And the output at the console is as follows:

01000111000011101011010011011000000100100110100101011011010100111011111110110111 00101100001001100010001100101001101110011000110110111010100010011111000101110011 00000010111101011110100100100100000101001111000110001101010011000001110100000011 10100001001011100110100110010011100110001110100111111110111101111000010100001110 11011001110001101111110111010111111110100110100000100001011100011100011001000101 01001111111011001101000010111010111010111100001101010001100001101011111010001111 00110010110101100010000101001111011111

and this goes on indefinitely.

share|improve this question
8  
What have you tried? What approach do you think would work? –  Oded Oct 12 '12 at 19:00

4 Answers 4

Bear in mind that your loop may will find 10 '0's in a row (.5^10) = 0.0977 % of the time. If you increase that amount you may want to put an additional check for when counter exceeds some threshold for number of numbers generated.

int zeroCount = 0
do {
    bin = (int) (Math.random()*2);
    System.out.print(bin);
    counter++;

    // Check for 10 in row:
    if(bin == 0) {
        zeroCount ++;
    } else {
        zeroCount = 0;
    }
    if(zeroCount == 10) {
        break;  // Exit loop
    }

    if(counter>=80) {
        System.out.print("\n");
        counter = counter-80;
        }
} while (bin < 2);
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much, this was very helpful. Also I figured the 10 0s in a row would take long, I just used 10 as an example. Thanks again! –  Eric Houle Oct 12 '12 at 19:15
    
Actually it won't take that long to find 10 0's - about 2^10 or 1,024 tries. –  D Stanley Oct 12 '12 at 19:22
    
@DStanley Actually my math is correct; if you solve x*0.000977 = 1 you get 1024 tries. I just was overestimating that to be a "long" loop. –  NominSim Oct 12 '12 at 19:30
    
@NominSim - I wasn't refuting your math, but it's not a "long time". 1,000 simple loops would run in a matter of milliseconds. –  D Stanley Oct 12 '12 at 19:38

Creating a Random can be slightly more efficient

Random rand = new Random();
for (int i = 1; i <= 10; i++) {
    int bin = rand.nextInt(2);
    System.out.print(bin);
    if (bin == 1) i = 0;
}

prints for example:

111101001011001001011000111100010110011001011111011100001110100011100100100101101011110110111101101010110111000000110111011010111001101111010100111011000000101011000100000010001001010010011100100011111100010100011101101111100100111110110101101010111010001111111010000101010011100110111100010001100011011011101001000010001001010010110000011000001011101001110001111110000101101100011100111110000010000010001100000001011110110000110000001000100010001010000111001111111111100101101111110101011000010101110000110010011111001100100010111001001010110100001111011001000101011101101010110110010010001000001011010101000001000101011001000101000001111100111011110111101100010010110100001111011111110000011001010111100101100100110101101101000011100101011010111001110011110011110010001110001111001101000001111001001100101101010111101000000101011011110100001001100000111100000101111010111011000010110011001010011000001001101001100011101100001000100110101011000100010010001011100100100010000111111010001010000001101011010101101001000110110011110000100101100100000000101001100011110110000000000

share|improve this answer
1  
Its what I got. ;) tens zeros will typically take 2^^10 or 1024 digits. –  Peter Lawrey Oct 12 '12 at 19:18
    
@ahenderson You are right that the output is likely to be the most expensive part. Whether buffer is needed isn't clear. –  Peter Lawrey Oct 12 '12 at 19:32
1  
Just to nitpick, the mathematical expectation is 1024 + 10 = 1034 digits :) –  Marko Topolnik Oct 12 '12 at 19:51
    
@MarkoTopolnik I don't think that is right, 1/(0.5^10) = 1024 digits –  NominSim Oct 12 '12 at 21:14
    
@NominSim At the very start, before any digits are generated, there is a 1/1024 chance that the next 10 digits will all be zero. Do the induction from that onwards. –  Marko Topolnik Oct 12 '12 at 21:20
  1. initialize a counter variable to zero outside the loop
  2. if the random result is 0, increment the counter, else reset the counter to 0
  3. if the counter == 10, break
share|improve this answer

A bitwise solution is fun...

int mask = 0x3FF; // masks last 10 bits
int buffer = mask; // initialize buffer to all ones

while ((mask & buffer) != 0) {
    int digit = (int) (Math.random() * 2);
    buffer = (buffer << 1) | digit;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.