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I am working on a piece where I want to get username from funky strings.

Example:

  • a> Jacob+Delta+2012_Bio
  • b> Diana_Bio_smith_2011
  • c> Bio_5+10+2012+Steve00

I want to parse the string, and remove special characters and certain common words like Bio, Year and Dates, and get the resultant string like below.

  • a> Jacob, Delta, would like to get both in an array.
  • B> Diana, Smith
  • c> Steve

Following is something I am trying:

    class TestStringSplit
        {
            static void Main()
            {

 char[] delimiterChars = { ' ', ',', '.', ':', '\t', '_','+','-' };

                string text = "Jacob+Delta+2012_Bio";
                System.Console.WriteLine("Original text: '{0}'", text);

                string[] words = text.Split(delimiterChars);
                System.Console.WriteLine("{0} words in text:", words.Length);

                foreach (string s in words)
                {
                    System.Console.WriteLine(s);
                }
            }
        }
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2  
You need to define the list of "special" characters and common words first. –  Matt Burland Oct 12 '12 at 19:02
1  
First you need to think of how it should work (outside of programming, just in general). What characters should be removed. What words need to be removed? Could you have a file that specified them if they might change? Is there some other way you can determine what words to keep/drop? If you can't do it as a person, then you can't write code to do it for you. –  Servy Oct 12 '12 at 19:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could do something like this:

string[] originals = new[]
    {
        "Jacob+Delta+2012_Bio",
        "Diana_Bio_smith_2011",
        "Bio_5+10+2012+Steve00"
    };

string[] ignoreMe = new[]
    {
        "Bio", "bio", "0", "1", "2", "3", "4", "5", "6", "7", "8", "9", "_", "+"
    };

IEnumerable<string[]> results = originals.Select(
    o => o.Split(ignoreMe, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries));

Note that this does the stripping and splitting in one go, which is a neat trick.

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