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Here is my example interface:

public interface IJob<T, R>
    where T : IStep
    where R : IDelivery
{
    T Step { get; set; }
    R Delivery { get; set; }
}

Here is my example implementation

public class ImageJob<T, R> : IJob<T, R>
    where T : ImageStep
    where R : ImageDelivery
{
    public T Step { get; set; }
    public R Delivery { get; set; }
}

Both ImageStep and ImageDelivery implement their respective interfaces (IStep, IDelivery)

Now what I'm trying to do is interface all of my repository methods. Let's take this method for example:

public void CreateJob(IJob<IStep, IDelivery> job);

So I create a new:

var job = new ImageJob<ImageStep, ImageDelivery>
{
    ...
}

And then I try to pass that into the repository method:

repository.CreateJob(job);

And I get an error saying:

Unable to cast ImageJob<ImageStep, ImageDeliver> to type IJob<IStep, Idelivery>

Can someone explain to me why this is throwing an error? Am I implementing and interfacing totally wrong?

Is there an elegant to solution to what I'm trying to do?

I want to abstract out each Job with different Step and Delivery methods, etc. Is this possible some other way? Or am I missing something entirely?

share|improve this question
    
+1 Covariance is tricky! I stepped into this problem, too. –  Dave T. Jan 23 '13 at 1:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think could use Covariance. This enables you to cast a specific Generic type to one of its Generic interfaces or base classes like:

MyType<object> list = new MyType<MyType>;

Class and interface decleration:

public interface IMyType<out T>{...}
public class MyType<T> : IMyType<T> {...}

The "out" keyword in the Generic decleration enables the cast.

Here is a nice page on the MSDN which may help you further

In your case it would be (if you don't net the setters in the interface

public interface IJob<out T, out R>
    where T : IStep
    where R : IDelivery
{
    T Step { get; }
    R Delivery { get; }
}

This should work with your implemented class

share|improve this answer
    
If you need both the getters and setters in the interface, you can't make such an interface with such an implementation. To see why, consider that you could, after the cast, try to set myObj.Step = new OtherStep(), which looks perfectly valid, but can't work, because myObj is implemented with T of ImageStep. –  Tim S. Oct 12 '12 at 19:22
    
That did the trick! Still learning C#, thanks for the solution! –  ehftwelve Oct 12 '12 at 19:22
    
@ehftwelve I'm glad I could help. Please vote for the answer :-) thanks! –  oberfreak Oct 12 '12 at 19:22

I think the declaration of IJob needs to be

public interface IJob<T, R>
    where T : IStep
    where R : IDelivery
{
    T Step { get; set; }
    R Delivery { get; set; }
}

Otherwise the T and R parameters are never used in the interface and IJob is effectively non-generic. Other than that, for clarity you may want to name the type parameters TStep and TDelivery.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, that's actually how it is. I'll make the change to the code above –  ehftwelve Oct 12 '12 at 19:14

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