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I have a relational table that connects two other tables based on their IDs. There can be duplicates for both columns - but there CANNOT be the same row twice. I handle the checking code side.

How do I remove duplicate rows (see below):

select * from people:

a | b
1   2
1   3
1   3
1   7
2   3
2   5
2   5
2   9

I want the result to be:

a | b
1   2
1   3
1   7
2   3
2   5
2   9
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Check this Post - stackoverflow.com/questions/2630440/… –  rs. Oct 12 '12 at 19:15
3  
Create another (temporary) table with a UNIQUE key, then insert over and it should ignore duplicates. –  Kermit Oct 12 '12 at 19:16
1  
+1 to @njk. I guess the lesson here is never to create a table without a unique key, preferably an auto-increment ID field. –  Spudley Oct 12 '12 at 19:18
    
The table isn't an auto increment. It's just a relationship table between two other tables. So technically I'm allowed duplicates in either column, but the combination of the two columns (row) CANNOT exist twice. –  user82302124 Oct 12 '12 at 19:29
    
@user82302124, can you provide the actual table structures? In your answer, I don't see what 'two columns' you just referred to. –  Ross Smith II Oct 12 '12 at 19:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There can be duplicates for both columns - but there CANNOT be the same row twice

That's a constraint on the table that you have not implemented. The constraint is a unique index on (a,b). If you had the index you would not have duplicates.

IMHO your best approach is to add the unique index to the table, using a temporary table to first remove the duplicates:

  1. Copy person to person_temp
  2. Delete all from person
  3. Add unique index to person
  4. Copy unique a,b from person_temp to `person.
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Thanks - Trying this now. Pretty sure this is what I need to do. –  user82302124 Oct 12 '12 at 22:19

This should work:

ALTER IGNORE TABLE people ADD UNIQUE (a,b);

If you don't want to add an index, then this should work:

DROP TABLE IF EXISTS people_old;
DROP TABLE IF EXISTS people_new;
CREATE TABLE people_new LIKE people;
INSERT INTO people_new SELECT DISTINCT * FROM people;
RENAME TABLE people TO people_old, people_new TO people;
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I'm not sure if this is what I want with my example - I'm not looking to make any column unique? –  user82302124 Oct 12 '12 at 20:42
    
Is the concern about adding an index, that by doing so, the code that inserts the records will fails when inserting the duplicates? You could solve this by changing the INSERTs to INSERT IGNOREs. –  Ross Smith II Oct 12 '12 at 21:26

This is how you can delete duplicate rows... I'll write you my example and you'll need to apply to your code. I have Actors table with ID and I want to delete the rows with repeated first_name

mysql> select actor_id, first_name from actor_2;
+----------+-------------+
| actor_id | first_name  |
+----------+-------------+
|        1 | PENELOPE    |
|        2 | NICK        |
|        3 | ED          |
....
|      199 | JULIA       |
|      200 | THORA       |
+----------+-------------+

200 rows in set (0.00 sec)

-Now I use a Variable called @a to get the ID if the next row have the same first_name(repeated, null if it's not).

mysql> select if(first_name=@a,actor_id,null) as first_names,@a:=first_name from actor_2 order by first_name;
+---------------+----------------+
|  first_names  | @a:=first_name |
+---------------+----------------+
|          NULL | ADAM           |
|            71 | ADAM           |
|          NULL | AL             |
|          NULL | ALAN           |
|          NULL | ALBERT         |
|           125 | ALBERT         |
|          NULL | ALEC           |
|          NULL | ANGELA         |
|           144 | ANGELA         |
...
|          NULL | WILL           |
|          NULL | WILLIAM        |
|          NULL | WOODY          |
|            28 | WOODY          |
|          NULL | ZERO           |
+---------------+----------------+
200 rows in set (0.00 sec)

-Now we can get only duplicates ID:

mysql> select first_names from (select if(first_name=@a,actor_id,null) as first_names,@a:=first_name from actor_2 order by first_name) as t1;
+-------------+
| first_names |
+-------------+
|        NULL |
|          71 |
|        NULL |
 ...
|          28 |
|        NULL |
+-------------+
200 rows in set (0.00 sec)

-the Final Step, Lets DELETE!

mysql> delete from actor_2 where actor_id in (select first_names from (select if(first_name=@a,actor_id,null) as first_names,@a:=first_name from actor_2 order by first_name) as t1);
Query OK, 72 rows affected (0.01 sec)

-Now lets check our table:

mysql> select count(*) from actor_2 group by first_name;
+----------+
| count(*) |
+----------+
|        1 |
|        1 |
|        1 |
...
|        1 |
+----------+
128 rows in set (0.00 sec)

it works, if you have any question write me back

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