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I'm starting to make a checkers game and I've got all my graphics plus the board drawn. Before I moved on to creating the pieces I was wondering what an easy way to tackle the logic side of the movement of pieces.. Should I make a table of every square, detecting if it has a piece and if so, what color? (i.e 0=empty, 1=red, 2=black) or do you guys have a better idea to this issue?

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closed as not a real question by kleopatra, Robert Longson, Martijn Pieters, ρяσѕρєя K, NullUserException Oct 13 '12 at 22:39

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Possibly better on gamedev.stackexchange.com –  Markus Oct 12 '12 at 19:53
    
Refer this:- forums.whirlpool.net.au/archive/1147465 –  Rahul Tripathi Oct 12 '12 at 19:54
1  
Are you asking about an algorithm for the computer to pick moves, or are you looking for logic to track the board position for two (presumably human) players? –  Ted Hopp Oct 12 '12 at 19:54
    
@Ted, the logic to track moves and pieces –  Chris Oct 12 '12 at 19:56
    
Then your question is pretty much a duplicate of this question. There are some good answers there. –  Ted Hopp Oct 12 '12 at 19:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

By using OOP principles I would go with something like:

enum Side {
  BLACK,
  RED;
}

class Position {
  int x, int y;
}

class Piece
{
  Position position; // position inside the board
  Side side; // which side the piece is
}

class Board
{
  Piece[][] board = new Piece[8][8];

  boolean isMoveLegal(Piece p, Position newPosition) {
    ...
  }

  void doMove(Piece p, Position newPosition) {
    if (isMoveLegal(p, newPosition) {
      // game logic of movement and eating other pieces if needed
    }
  }
}

A more naive approach could use a simple map:

class Position {
  int x, int y;
}

class Piece
{
  Side side; // which side the piece is
}

class Board
{
  HashMap<Piece, Position> board;

  boolean isMoveLegal(Piece p, Position newPosition) {
    ...
  }

  void doMove(Piece p, Position newPosition) {
    if (isMoveLegal(p, newPosition) {
      // game logic of movement and eating other pieces if needed
    }
  }
}

That can be use to avoid storing the current position of a piece inside itself.

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So I would have to pre-define the pieces in the array? –  Chris Oct 12 '12 at 20:05
    
This seems overly baroque. There's a lot of redundant data (e.g., the Piece stored at, say, board[2][3] needs to have [2][3] stored in its position attribute). Every time a piece moves, you need to update data in two places in a consistent manner. –  Ted Hopp Oct 12 '12 at 20:05
    
It merely depends on where you want to place the logic of movement. I often found myself in situations in which it is better to have redundant data than finding a way to obtaining some information that you haven't planned to store before. Especially for a simple task like a checker game (it happened to find myself in the same kind of situation in a more complex environment and storing the position together with the element has been a good choice). –  Jack Oct 12 '12 at 20:15
    
Without storing the position you couldn't be able to have a move logic without specifying the position in addition to the piece, it is a matter of taste, I prefer to have move(Piece piece, Position newPos) than move(Piece piece, Position oldPos, Position newPos) or even worse move(Position oldPos, Position newPos) (since you don't even need to know the piece from a compact point of view. –  Jack Oct 12 '12 at 20:18

You should make a two dimensional array to represent the board.

int[][] board = new int[8][8];
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1  
how would that help? –  Chris Oct 12 '12 at 19:58
    
I'm not going to write his checkers game. He asked how to represent the board –  Bob Dylan Oct 12 '12 at 19:59
1  
Actually, he asked about the bookkeeping needed to keep track of moves. That's a bit more involved than just representing the board as a matrix. –  Ted Hopp Oct 12 '12 at 20:01
    
Besides, this is a bad representation of a checker board, 1/2 your memory is unused, and you have to write a lot of routines the increment and decrement one index in coordination with another. –  Edwin Buck Oct 12 '12 at 20:14

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