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My data is arranged in a particular way, without headers, and with columns that do not necessarily contain the same kind of information. A portion of it can be produced using:

data <- textConnection("rs123,22,337647,C,T
1,7385,0.4156,-0.0019,0.0037
1,16550,0.959163800640972,-0.0241,0.0128
1,17218,0.0528,0.015,0.039
rs193,22,366349,C,T
1,7385,0.3708,0.0017,0.0035
1,16550,0.793259111116741,-0.0028,0.009
1,17218,0.9547,-0.016,0.033
rs194,22,366300,NA,NA
0,0,0,0,0
0,0,0,0,0
0,0,0,0,0
rs118,22,301327,C,T
1,7385,0.0431,-0.0085,0.0077
1,16550,0.789981059331214,0.0036,0.0092
1,17218,0.99,-0.057,0.062
rs120,22,497528,C,G
1,7385,0.0716,0.0012,0.0073
1,16550,0.233548238634496,-0.0033,0.0064
1,17218,0.4563,-0.002,0.015
rs109,22,309825,A,G
1,5520,0.8611,2e-04,0.0044
0,0,0,0,0
1,17218,0.9762,0.076,0.044
rs144,22,490068,C,T
0,0,0,0,0
0,0,0,0,0
1,17218,0.2052,-0.013,0.032")
mydata <- read.csv(data, header = F, sep = ",", stringsAsFactors=FALSE)

My question is this: I can write a line to grep/awk lines containing 'NA' (these are the SNPs that contain no data)

grep -v 'NA' file.in > file.out

But how can I then ALSO specify that the 3 following lines ALSO be removed? I do NOT want to remove every line containing all zeros, only the lines containing all zeros that follow a line containing a SNP with 'NA's.

Thank you for your input!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Using GNU sed (because the number of lines following an address is an extension):

sed -e '/NA/,+3 d' infile

EDIT to add the awk solution:

awk '/NA/ { for ( i = 1; i <= 4; i++ ) { getline; } } { print }' infile
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I want this to work.. but it's giving me the error: sed: 1: "/NA/,+3 d ": expected context address I tried using double quotes to no avail. –  mfk534 Oct 12 '12 at 20:33
    
You will need the GNU version of sed. I've edited to add a solution using awk. –  Birei Oct 12 '12 at 20:35
    
I'm not sure about the version of sed I'm using, but awk line does the trick. Thank you very much! –  mfk534 Oct 12 '12 at 20:52
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After importing into R, you could do:

# identify the rows containing any NA's
narows <- which(apply(mydata,1,function(x) any(is.na(x))))
# identify the rows containing all 0's
zerorows <- which(apply(mydata==0,1,all))

# get the rows that either contain NAs, or are all 0 and are 
# within 3 of the NA rows
rowstodelete <- c(narows,
                  intersect(
                    (sapply(c(narows),function(x) seq(x,x+3))),
                    zerorows
                  )
                )

# subset mydata to only remove the NA rows + the following 3 "zero rows"
mydata[-rowstodelete,]
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This works too - thank you! –  mfk534 Oct 12 '12 at 20:54
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Update: my previous answer was probably wrong, so I've got this alternative:

nas <- apply(mydata, 1, function(x) any(is.na(x)))
s <- apply(mydata == 0, 1, all)
out <- which(nas)
for (i in which(nas)) {
  j <- i + 1
  while (!is.na(s[j]) && s[j]) {
    out <- c(out, j)
    j <- j + 1
  }
}
mydata2 <- mydata[-out,]

At first I thought that you only cared about the first 3 rows after the NA, but it really seems that you want to delete all consecutive rows with all zeros after each NA.

(This is my previous answer:)

nas <- apply(mydata, 1, function(x) any(is.na(x)))
whereToLook <- sort(which(nas) + 1:3)
s <- apply(mydata == 0, 1, prod)
zeros <- which(s == 1)
whereToErase <- zeros[zeros %in% whereToLook]
whereToErase <- c(which(nas), whereToErase)
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Yes - this solution works. Thanks very much! –  mfk534 Oct 12 '12 at 20:57
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This might work for you (GNU sed):

 sed '/\<NA\>/!b;:a;$!N;s/\n\(0,\)\+0$//;ta;D' file

This will remove any lines containing NA and any following 0,...0 lines

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